People

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Gerard P. Learmonth, Sr.

Research Associate Professor

jl5c@virginia.edu

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Gerard P. Learmonth Sr. is Research Associate Professor in the Department of Systems and Information Engineering in the School of Engineering and Applied Science. He holds a secondary appointment as Associate Professor in the Department of Public Health Sciences in the School of Medicine. Prior academic appointments include the George Washington University, Boston College, and Dartmouth College.

Current research projects include: the continued development of participatory simulation focused on sustainability of the Chesapeake Bay Watershed -- the UVa Bay Game; a large-scale simulation model of the U.S. healthcare system to assess the impact of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; and an agent-based simulation model to assess the efficacy of planned water and sanitation interventions to improve the long-term health and growth of children in Limpopo Province, South Africa.

 

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Michael Purvis

Research Assistant

mcp2h@virginia.edu

Michael Purvis earned his Masters Degree from the Department of Systems and Information Engineering at the University of Virginia in December 2009. Raised in Charlottesville, Michael is honored to have graduated from UVA (twice) and to continue to work for one of the country's top Universities. As a Research Assistant, he develops and maintains the UVA Bay Game, an online multiplayer simulation game of the Chesapeake Bay Watershed and the stakeholders in the bay area.

 

Mark Paddrik

Graduate Student

mp3ua@virginia.edu

Mark Paddrik is a PhD Candidate with a MS & BS in System Engineering and BA in Economics from the University of Virginia. He has done work in time series forecasting in US equities and futures for risk management for Pace Global Energy and ARC. A few papers that are related to this work include "strategies for hedging and trading in the emerging ethanol commodities market", "risk metric allocation methodology in financial markets", and "preventative market failure: a look at returns and information's effect on market liquidity".

His current interests lie in the use of agent-based simulation for policy decision making in finance and health care. He works with the Commodities and Futures Trading Commission to help detect and prevent manipulative trading practices. With the UVA hospital he is helping to investigate how to prevent the creation and spread of drug-resistant bacteria.

 

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Kyle Oyama

Graduate Student

kfo2gj@virginia.edu

Kyle Oyama is a doctoral student in the Systems and Information Engineering Department. He received degrees in Industrial Engineering (Northwestern University, 1998) and Research and Development Management (Air Force Institute of Technology, 2010). He has served as an Air Force officer for over 13 years as a program manager and engineer on procurement projects such as the B-1 bomber mission planning system and the V-22 training system. He has also performed contract management in foreign nations and deployed locations. He is currently a member of the Air Force Institute of Technology’s (AFIT) faculty pipeline program under which he will return to serve as a faculty member at AFIT after completing his doctorate at UVA. Kyle’s research interests include technology and innovation management, product architecture, organizational design, concurrent engineering, and agent-based simulation of large scale product development.

 

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Matthew White

Graduate Student

whw7v@virginia.edu

Bio coming soon!

 

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Johnny Gan

Graduate Student

cg8pa@virginia.edu

Johnny Gan is a first year PhD student at University of Virginia in the Department of Systems and Information Engineering. He received a Bachelor of Science in Computer Science from Cornell University in 2004, followed by a Master of Engineering in Operations Research and Industrial Engineering from Cornell University in 2005. Johnny's research interests are in simulation and modeling, particularly for large-scale complex problems that are difficult to solve analytically whichare frequently encountered in the real world. He would also like to work on developing heuristics (for example genetic algorithms) that are able to adequately solve such large scale problems.

 

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Patrick Harrison

Graduate Student

pwh5r@virginia.edu

Patrick Harrison is a second-year M.S. student in the Systems and Information Engineering Department at the University of Virginia. He received his B.A. in Economics ('09), also from the University of Virginia. In addition to his studies at Virginia, he has taken classes on Complex Systems at the New England Complex Systems Institute in Cambridge, MA (www.necsi.edu). Patrick's research interests lie in the application of complexity theory, network analysis, and agent-based modeling to complex social, technical, and environmental systems. Current projects include his Master's Thesis work in developing agent-based, participatory simulation models of socio-environmental watershed systems, and using agent-based modeling to explore the relationships between ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and residential settlement patterns within cities.

 

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Ryan Bobko

Graduate Student

rpb6eg@virginia.edu

Ryan Bobko graduated in 1997 from The Johns Hopkins University with a BS in Computer Science. From there, he went on to a career in the IT industry, specializing in systems administration and database design before eventually settling on software design. He is currently a system architect with Battelle Memorial Institute. He joined the UVA Systems Department in 2009, and the CSML shortly thereafter. His principal research interest is nutrient flows in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed. He is developing a general architecture for agent-based watershed modeling.

 

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James Burke

Graduate Student

jlb3ez@virginia.edu

 

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John Solvensky

Graduate Student

jas8jd@virginia.edu