“Rose Hill,” by an unknown artist, Charleston, South Carolina (The Charleston Museum)

Rose Hill

Morgan, Phillip D. Slave Counterpoint: Black Culture in the Eighteenth-Century Chesapeake and the Lowcountry. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1998.

Smith, Mark. Mastered by the Clock: Time, Slavery, and Freedom in the American South. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1997.

Heyward Family Papers. Microfilm 1705, Series A, part 2, reels 12 and 13.

Shackel, Paul A. and Barbara J. Little. Historical Archaeology of the Chesapeake. Smithsonian Institution Press, 1994.

1. This painting on exhibit in the “Landscape of Slavery: The Plantation in American Art” exhibition shows the main house and some of the outbuildings of a working plantation. What were the various building typically found on a rice plantation and what might they have looked like?

2. How was time apportioned on the nineteenth-century plantation? Did the kind of plantation (tobacco, rice, cotton, sugar) make a difference? If so, why?

3. Using the Heyward family plantation daybooks, diaries, and correspondence, reconstruct as best you can daily life on the plantation for the slaves belonging to the Heyward family.

4. Using the Heyward family plantation daybooks, diaries and correspondence, reconstruct as best you can daily life for the Heyward family. Please be sure to include their time in Charleston as well as on the plantation. (One of the diaries kept by Charles Heyward is also in the exhibition).