Miles Brewton House (1765-69), Charleston , South Carolina, interior view of the "hall" or dining room

Miles Brewton house Miles Brewton house outside

Visser, Margaret. The Rituals of Dinner: The Orgins, Evolutions and Meanings of Table Manners. 1991.

Bivins, John and J. Thomas Savage."The Miles Brewton house, Charleston, South Carolina," The Magazine Antiques 143.2 (Feb. 1993): 294-307.

Bivins, John. "Charleston Rococo Interiors, 1765-1775: The Sommers' Carver," Journal of Early Southern Decorative Arts, 12 (Nov. 1986): 1-122.

"Journal of Josiah Quincy, Junior, 1773, "Proceedings of the Massachusetts Historical Society, 49 (June 1916).

Wenger, Mark R. "The Dining Room in Early Virginia," in Perspectives in Vernacular Architecture III, ed. Thomas Carter and Bernard L. Herman, (Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 1989): 149-159.

Lane, Mills. Architecture of the Old South: South Carolina. Savannah: Beehive Press, 1984.

Crawford, Richard. America's Musical Life: A History. Norton, 2001.

1. Discuss the dining room as a chamber.Survey room-by-room probate inventories for the period. What was usually found in a dining room and what does that reveal about the social customs of dining? http://www.gunstonhall.org/library/probate/index.htm

2. To what extent is the Miles Brewster House a product of an eighteenth-century architectural pattern book culture?

3. New Englander Josiah Quincy describes a dining experience in this chamber in his late eighteenth-century journal of his experience in Charleston. What does that entry reveal about what Quincy thought was different about life in Charleston?

4. What kinds of musical entertainment might have been heard in a chamber like this one in 1770? In 1840? Charleston had the first public musical performance society, the St. Cecelia Society. How did private musical performances differ from public ones?