Job and career notes for French majors

I'm starting this page because often tidbits cross my desk that might be of interest to people thinking of majoring in French, or to French majors soon to leave college starting to think about the workplace. Right now, it's just a "bud" of a page that I hope will flower as time goes on. I have not sat down in an exhaustive or systematic way to try to say everything that should be said about the topic. Comments, corrections, suggestions and additions welcome.

Did you know...

* Forbes reports that French is the language of the future, according to a study by Natixis investment bank projecting French will be the "most-spoken language in the world" by 2050. I urge you to read the article and to think about the study's methodology, to see if you agree with the bank's analysis. Read article

*ABC News reports that according to Bloomberg Rankings, French is the second most useful language in the world for business. Read article

* Inside HIgher Ed reports that French majors made far larger gains during college than students in other majors, in their writing, analytical, and critical thinking skills, as measured by the CLA (Collegiate Learning Assessment). Read article / Read analysis for possible explanations

* Newsweek reports a French major as one of the top ten most useful majors "according to science." "Useful, for our purposes, is defined by majors most likely to lead to less unemployment and higher earnings, and which are in industries projected to grow in the next decade according to research from Georgetown University and data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics." Read article.

* Jonathan Moore, Peace Corps campus recruiter at the University of Virginia, writes: "Now more than ever, French speakers are in hot demand across all Peace Corps assignment sectors (Environment, Agriculture, Health, Business, Education, and Community/Youth Development), and largely in Africa and the Caribbean. And while French skills alone won't qualify an applicant for Peace Corps service, if you have French skills plus work or volunteering experience in any of the above sectors, you quickly become a highly competitive candidate. We generally have little trouble filling our Spanish-speaking assignment spots these days, but French language enrollment isn't as prevalent as it once was, and so it's considered a "scarce" skill."

* Applicants for assistant professorships in French departments at colleges and universities regularly test the applicants' French language skills. If they are not good enough at speaking the language, they are not considered for the position. Read article

* NPR's Steve Henn highlights "Utah's secret weapon" for job creation: "Utah happens to have the highest percentage of foreign-language speakers in the country. It's the state's secret economic weapon.Every year, thousands of Mormon missionaries come back to Utah after spending two years abroad, learning a foreign language, foreign customs and intricacies of a foreign culture." Listen to story

* Robert Lane Greene, a business correspondent for The Economist, explains why he thinks French (not Mandarin) is the most useful language to learn for business. Read article

* Bilingualism makes you smarter, says new research reported in the New York Times. Read article.

* There is an association between living abroad and creativity, say William Maddux, an assistant professor of organizational behavior at INSEAD and Adam Galinsky, the Morris and Alice Kaplan Professor of Ethics and Decision in Management at the Kellogg School The longer the time spent abroad, the higher the scores on creativity tests, their study found. Read article.

* Why do foreign language majors make such gains in critical thinking skills, compared to other majors? In attempting to explain this, scholars at Kalamazoo College suggest that "second language learning might enhance competency in the native language as well as critical thinking and problem-solving skills [...because of] four attributes—metalinguistic awareness, critical reading, critical thinking and problem solving, and cross-cultural literacy—that receive explicit and regular attention in language courses and that may contribute to better performance on tasks like the CLA (Collegiate Learning Assessment)." Read article.

On the humanities in general...

* Steve Jobs, March 4, 2011, as he unveiled the new I-pad: "I've said this before, but thought it was worth repeating: It's in Apple's DNA that technology alone is not enough. That it's technology married with liberal arts, married with the humanities, that yields us the result that makes our hearts sing." He will be missed.