Nicola Bezzo

nbezzo@virginia.edu

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My Testbed

An overview of the robots and equipment available in my Lab.

Vicon Motion Capture System

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Asctec Firefly

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Asctec Pelican

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AscTec Hummingbird

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Clearpath Jackal

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American Built Automobile

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Black-I LandShark

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MiniShark

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3DR Iris

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Foldable and Printable Robots

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Parrot AR.Drone

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MobileRobots Pioneer 3-AT

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AscTec Hummingbird with directional antennas

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Octoroach

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Description

The Vicon MOCAP allows fast and precise tracking and pose estimation of each robot inside the Lab

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Firefly is a state of the art hexarotor equipped with i7 CPU and several sensors which includes: GPS, IMU, pressure sensor, stereo cameras, and Lidar.

This platform is used for motion planning and attack resilient control against sensors and actuators spoofing.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Pelican is a state of the art quadrotor equipped with i7 CPU and several sensors which includes: GPS, IMU, pressure sensor, stereo cameras, and Lidar. Currently there are 2 configurations in the Lab

This platform is used for motion planning and attack resilient control against sensors and actuators spoofing.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Hummingbird is a state of the art quadrotor equipped with GPS, IMU, and pressure sensor. Currently there are 3 configurations in the Lab

This platform is used for motion planning and multi vehicle operations.

 

 

 

 

 

The Jackal is a state of the art unmanned ground vehicle (UGV) equipped with i7 CPU and several sensors: GPS, wheel encoders, IMUs, cameras, and velodyne lidars.

This platform is used for mapping, exploration, attack resilient control against sensors and actuators spoofing, and heterogeneous robotic operations.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The ABA is a modern automobile equipped with several sensors which includes: a GPS, wheel encoders, IMUs, radars, speedometers, and more.

This platform is part of the DARPA Hacms project. It is used to test attack resilient controllers against sensors and actuators spoofing. Among the demonstrations on this prototype, we implemented attack resilient control on a cruse control and adaptive cruise control case studies.

 

 

 

The LandShark UGV is a skid- steering heavy duty 700lb unmanned ground vehicle. This particular version is equipped with any kind of sensors you can imagine. The sensors suite includes: a GPS, wheel encoders, two IMUs, two laser range finders, two radar,four infrared sensors, current sensors, a motorized turret with thermal imager and four hi-res cameras. The LandShark uses a quad core i7 CPU with ROS.

This platform is part of the DARPA Hacms project. It is used to test attack resilient controllers against sensors and actuators spoofing.

 

 

 

The MiniShark UGV is a skid- steering versatile unmanned ground vehicle. It was developed at UPenn with the help of Prof. Dan Lee's group. It is a smaller and lighter (and cheaper) version of the LandShark. It is equipped with similar sensors as in the LandShark which includes: a GPS, four wheel encoders, two IMUs, a laser range finders, a webcam, and a Asus Xtion Pro(an improved version of the Kinect). The MiniShark uses a quad core i7 CPU with ROS.

This platform is used to test: 1) test attack resilient controllers against sensors and actuators spoofing, 2) inter-agent control, and 3) automatic code generation.

 

 

The IRIS quadrotor is equipped with a pixhawk autopilot with IMU and GPS sensors. This aerial vehicle is used to test attack resilient state estimators similarly to the LandShark robot. We are currently enhancing it by adding more sensors and an on-board computer

 

 

 

 

 

 

The printable and foldable robots are a new concept of robotics that leverages inexpensive materials and fabrication and programming techniques to make robotics available to the masses. These robots are developed at UPenn (Vijay Kumar's group), MIT (Daniela Rus's group), and Harvard (Rob Wood's group). They are assembled using origami techniques, 3D printers, and self-folding methods. My goal is to create programming environments to facilitate and automate the co-design and prototyping of hardware (mechanical and electronics) and software (high-level and low-level) designs. To this end we have created ROSLab, a programming language based on blocks and links that allows a non-expert user to create the hardware and software specifications of these type of robots.

Example of platforms developed and programmed using this tool are micro quadrotors, segways, and ant robots.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Parrot is an inexpensive toy quadrotor. We use this platform in ROS and do experiments on path planning, tracking, and security, similarly to the IRIS quadrotor.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The followings are robots that I used mostly during my PhD.

The Pioneer robot is a skid steering vehicle. It is equipped with lidar, imu, light, magnetic, temperature sensors, sonars, wheel encoders, GPS, and xbees. I used this platform for swarming and coordination of multi vehicle systems under communication constraints. For more details visit my old UNM Webpage

 

 

 

 

 

The Hummingbird quadrotor is very stable and robust indoor quadrotor. It is equipped with IMU and direction antennas for experiments on diversity and heterogeneous missions. For more details visit my old UNM Webpage

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Octoroach is a light weight robot built using similar techniques to the printable and foldable robotics described above. It is one of the first examples of origami like robots. Because of it's light weight and small dimension is the perfect agent for heterogeneous missions involving quadrotors. For more details and videos visit my old UNM Webpage