Posts Tagged ‘coordination in conversation’

Get The FACS Fast

Wednesday, September 16th, 2009

Brick, T.R., Hunter, M.D., & Cohn, J.F. Get The FACS Fast: Automated FACS face analysis benefits from the addition of velocity. 2009 International Conference on Affective Computing & Intelligent Interaction (ACII 2009)

This article reports that the accuracy of automatic recognition of FACS codes from video data can be improved by including velocity and acceleration of tracked points on faces from the Cohn-Kanade database.

The article can be downloaded as a PDF.

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Effects of Damping Head Movement and Facial Expression in Dyadic Conversation Using Real-Time Facial Expression Tracking and Synthesized Avatars

Thursday, July 9th, 2009

Boker, S. M., Cohn, J. F., Theobald, B.-J., Matthews, I., Brick, T. & Spies, J. (in press) Effects of Damping Head Movement and Facial Expression in Dyadic Conversation Using Real-Time Facial Expression Tracking and Synthesized Avatars. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B.

This article reports an experiment in which research assistants’ head movements and facial expressions were motion tracked during videoconference conversations, an avatar face was reconstructed in real time, and naive participants spoke with the avatar face. Research assistants’ facial expressions, vocal inflections, and head movements were attenuated at one minute intervals in a fully crossed experimental design. Attenuated head movements led to increased head nods and lateral head turns, and attenuated facial expressions led to increased head nodding in both naive participants and in confederates. The results are consistent with a hypothesis that the dynamics of head movements in dyadic conversation include a shared equilibrium.

(a) four facial expression (b) four attenuated facial expression.

The manuscript of this article accepted for publication can be downloaded as a PDF. This preprint may not exactly replicate the final version published in the journal. It is not the copy of record.

Spatiotemporal Symmetry and Multifractal Structure of Head Movements

Wednesday, July 1st, 2009

Ashenfelter, K. T., Boker, S. M., Waddell, J. R., & Vitanov, N. (in press). Spatiotemporal Symmetry and Multifractal Structure of Head Movements during Dyadic Conversation. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception & Performance

This study examined the influence of sex, social dominance, and context on motion-tracked head movements during dyadic conversations. Windowed cross-correlation analyses found high peak correlation between conversants’ head movements over short (2 second) intervals and a high degree of nonstationarity. Nonstationarity in head movements was found to be related to gender of the participants. Multifractal analysis found small-scale fluctuations to be persistent, and large-scale fluctuations to be antipersistent. These results are consistent with a view that symmetry is formed between conversants over short intervals and that this symmetry is broken at longer, irregular intervals.

(a) Coordination between dancers is mostly stationary (b) Coordination during conversation is highly nonstationary.

The manuscript of this article accepted for publication can be downloaded as a PDF. This article may not exactly replicate the final version published in the APA journal. It is not the copy of record.

Mapping and Manipulating Facial Expression

Wednesday, July 1st, 2009

Theobald, B., Matthews, I., Mangini, M., Spies, J., Brick, T., Cohn, J. F., & Boker, S. (2009) Mapping and Manipulating Visual Prosody. Language and Speech 52:2, 369-386.

This article, just published in Language and Speech, describes the process by which we are mapping facial expressions from one individual to another in real time.

The manuscript as it was submitted can be downloaded as a PDF

Something in the Way We Move - JEP:HPP 2009 Demo Video

Thursday, May 21st, 2009

This is the demonstration video accompanying the publication linked here.

Download in MOV format.

Something in the Way We Move - JEP:HPP 2009 Article

Thursday, May 21st, 2009

Boker, S. M., Cohn, J. F., Theobald, B., Matthews, I., Mangini, M., Spies, J. R., Ambadar, Z., & Brick, T. R.  (In press). Something in the Way We Move: Motion Dynamics, not Perceived Sex, Influence Head Movements in Conversation. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance.

The manuscript of this article accepted for publication can be downloaded as a PDF This article may not exactly replicate the final version published in the APA journal. It is not the copy of record.