The Middle East Studies Program
at the University of Virginia



All MESP Course Offerings

The following list is derived from the Undergraduate Record for 2003-2004.

Anthropology
ANTH 247 - (3) (Y)
Reflections of Exile: Jewish Languages and their Communities
Covers Jewish languages Yiddish, Judeo-Arabic, Ladino, and Hebrew from historical, linguistic, and literary perspectives. Explores the relations between communities and languages, the nature of diaspora, and the death and revival of languages. No prior knowledge of these languages is required. This course is cross-listed with AMEL 247.

ANTH 347 - (3) (Y)
Language and Culture in the Middle East
Prerequisite: Previous course in anthropology, linguistics, Middle East Studies or permission of instructor.
Introduction to peoples, languages, cultures and histories of the Middle East. Focuses on Israel/Palestine as a microcosm of important social processes-such as colonialism, nationalism, religious fundamentalism, and modernization-that affect the region as a whole. This course is cross-listed with AMEL 347.

ANTH 555 - (3) (IR)
Topics in Ethnology of the Middle East
Seminars on topics announced prior to each semester.

ANTH 592 - (3) (SI)
Archaeology of Colonial Expansions
Prerequisite: For undergraduates, ANTH 401 senior seminar or instructor permission.
Exploration of the archaeology of frontiers, expansions and colonization, focusing on European expansion into Africa and the Americas while using other archaeologically-known examples (e.g., Roman, Bantu) as comparative studies.


Art History

ARTH 211 - (3) (IR)
Art of the Ancient Near East and Prehistoric Europe
Studies the art of Mesopotamia, Egypt, the Aegean, and prehistoric Europe, from the sixth to the second millennium B.C. Examines the emergence of a special role for the arts in ancient religion.

ARTH 214 - (3) (Y)
Etruscan and Roman Art
Studies the painting, sculpture and architecture in Italy and the Roman Empire from the time of the Etruscans to Constantine the Great. Emphasizes the political and social role of art in ancient Rome, the dissolution of classical art, and the formation of medieval art.

ARTH 221 - (3) (IR)
Early Christian and Byzantine Art
Studies the art of the early Church in East and West and its subsequent development in the East under the aegis of Byzantium. Includes the influence of theological, liturgical and political factors on the artistic expression of Eastern Christian spirituality.

ARTH 263 - (3) (IR)
Arts of the Islamic World
The class is an overview of art made in the service of Islam in the Central Islamic Lands, Egypt, North Africa, Spain, Turkey, Iran, Central Asia, and South and Southeast Asia.

ARTH 522 - (3) (IR)
Byzantine Art
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Studies the art of Byzantium and its cultural dependencies from its roots in the late Antique period to the last flowering under the Palaeologan dynasty.


AMELC
AMEL 100 - (3) (Y)
From Genghis Khan to Stalin: Invasions and Empires of Central Asia
Survey of Central Asian civilizations from the first to the twenty-first centuries, with particular emphasis on nomadism, invasions, conquests, and major religious-cultural developments.

AMEL 101 - (3) (Y)
Literatures of Asia and the Middle East
An introductory course in non-Western literatures that emphasizes genres with no clear Western equivalents. The reading list varies from year to year, but the texts, read in translation, usually come from Arabic, Chinese, Hebrew, Hindi, Japanese, Persian, Sanskrit, Tamil and Urdu.

AMEL 247 - (3) (Y)
Reflections of Exile: Jewish Languages and their Communities
Covers Jewish languages Yiddish, Judeo-Arabic, Ladino, and Hebrew from historical, linguistic, and literary perspectives. Explores the relations between communities and languages, the nature of diaspora, and the death and revival of languages. No prior knowledge of these languages is required. This course is cross-listed with ANTH 247.

AMEL 347 - (3) (Y)
Language and Culture in the Middle East
Prerequisite: Prior coursework in anthropology, or middle east studies, or linguistics, or permission of the instructor.
Introduction to peoples, languages, cultures and histories of the Middle East. Focuses on Israel/Palestine as a microcosm of important social processes-such as colonialism, nationalism, religious fundamentalism, and modernization-that affect the region as a whole. This course is cross-listed with ANTH 347.

AMEL 493, 494 - (1-3) (SI)
Independent Study
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Independent study in special field under the direction of a faculty member in Asian and Middle Eastern Languages and Cultures.

AMTR 301 - (3) (SI)
Men and Women of Asia and the Middle East
Focuses on literature of Asia and the Middle East (Chinese, Japanese, Persian) which depicts the world as seen through the eyes of men and women; includes poetry and prose from Ancient to Modern.

AMTR 311/511 - (3) (IR)
Women and Middle-Eastern Literatures
Explores some of the basic issues of women's identity in Middle Eastern literature. In a variety of readings (poetry, short-story, novel, and autobiography) by men and women, it explores both the image and presence of women in a rich and too-often neglected literature.

ARAB 101, 102 - (4) (Y)
Elementary Arabic
Prerequisite for ARAB 102: ARAB 101 or equivalent.
Introduction to the sound and writing systems of Arabic, including basic sentence structure and morphological patterns. A combination of the direct, audio-lingual, proficiency-based, and translation methods is used. The format consists of classroom discussions of a certain grammatical point followed by intensive practice.

ARAB 201, 202 - (4) (Y)
Intermediate Arabic
Prerequisite for ARAB 201: ARAB 102, or equivalent, or instructor permission.
Prerequisite for ARAB 202: ARAB 201, or equivalent, or instructor permission.Continues training in modern standard Arabic, with emphasis on speaking, comprehension, writing, and reading. The method of teaching primarily follows the proficiency-based approach to language learning.

ARAB 225 - (3) (Y)
Conversational Arabic
Prerequisite: ARAB 202 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
Introduces students to spoken Arabic, with oral production highly emphasized.

ARAB 226 - (3) (IR)
Conversational Arabic
Prerequisite: ARAB 225 or equivalent, or instructor permission.
Practice of conversation based on everyday situations. Enables communication with native speakers.

ARAB 227 - (3) (Y)
Culture and Society of the Contemporary Arab Middle East (in English)
Introduces the cultural traits and patterns of contemporary Arab society based on scholarly research, recent field work, and personal experiences and observations in the Arab world. No knowledge of Arabic is required.

ARAB 301/501, 302/502 - (3) (Y)
Readings in Literary Arabic
Prerequisite: ARAB 202, or equivalent, or instructor permission.
Emphasizes reading of modern texts for oral-aural practice, as well as writing.

ARAB 323/523 - (3) (Y)
Arabic Conversation and Composition (in Arabic)
Prerequisite: ARAB 302 or instructor permission.
Emphasizes development of writing and speaking skills, with special attention to grammar, syntax, vocabulary, and the organization and style of different genres.

ARAB 324/524 - (3) (Y)
Advanced Arabic Conversation and Composition (in Arabic)
Prerequisite: ARAB 323 or equivalent or instructor permission.
Develops oral and written proficiency to an advanced level of fluency, with emphasis on speaking and writing.

ARAB 333/533 - (3) (Y)
Arabic of the Quran and Hadith I
Prerequisite: ARAB 202 or higher or permission of instructor.
Studies the language of the Quran and its exegesis, and the Hadith

ARAB 334/534 - (3) (Y)
Arabic of the Quran and Hadith II
Prerequisite: ARAB 235 or permission of instructor.
Studies the language of the Quran, its exegesis, and the Hadith.

ARAB 493, 494 - (1-3) (Y)
Independent Study in Arabic

ARAB 528 - (3) (SI)
The History of the Arabic Language (in English)
Prerequisite: At least one year of Arabic or Hebrew, and/or historical linguistics.
Traces history of Arabic and its development up to present day. Studies the relation of Arabic to other languages that come in contact with it either through genetic relationship, such as Hebrew and Aramaic; or through conquest, such as Persian, Coptic, Berber, and others. Examines the external and internal factors of linguistic change.

ARAB 583 - (3) (Y)
Topics in Arabic Prose
Prerequisite: ARAB 302/502, or equivalent, or instructor permission.
Emphasis on reading modern Arabic prose, and writing descriptive and narrative short essays.

ARAB 584 - (3) (Y)
Topics in Arabic Prose
Prerequisite: ARAB 583, or instructor permission.
Exposure to selected reading material in modern Arabic prose, and writing of short essays, summaries, and descriptive pieces in Arabic.

ARAB 585 - (3) (Y)
Media Arabic
Prerequisite: ARAB 583 and 584 or ARAB 301/501 and 302/502 or instructor permission.
Examination of electronic (television and radio) and print (newspapers, magazines, periodic publications) Arabic.

ARAB 586 - (3) (Y)
Nineteenth Century Arabic Prose
Prerequisite: ARAB 583 and 584 or instructor permission.
Examination of Arabic writing in the 19th century, a period of renaissance in the Arabic language.

ARTR 329/529 - (3) (Y)
Modern Arabic Literature in Translation
Introduction to the development and themes of modern Arabic literature (poetry, short stories, novels and plays). Taught in English.

ARTR 339 - (3) (Y)
Love, Alienation, and Politics in Contemporary Arabic Novel
Introduction to the Arabic Novel with emphasis on a medium for expounding political issues of the Arab World.

HEBR 101, 102 - (3) (Y)
Introduction to Modern Hebrew
Prerequisite for HEBR 102: HEBR 101.
An introduction to the pronunciation, vocabulary, grammar, and writing system of modern Israeli Hebrew. By the end of this sequence students have mastered the core grammatical principles of Hebrew, along with a basic vocabulary of 1000 words, and they are able to read and understand simple texts and carry out simple conversation. Includes material on Israeli culture, history, and politics.

HEBR 201, 202 - (4) (S)
Intermediate Modern Hebrew
Prerequisite: HEBR 102 with grade of C or above or instructor permission.
Continuation of the study of the fundamentals of grammar, with special attention to verb conjugation, noun declension, and syntactic structure, and their occurrence in texts which deal with modern Israeli culture and values. These texts, which include excerpts from newspapers and fiction, introduce 600 new words and expose the learner to political and other issues of modern Israel.

HEBR 301, 302 - (3) (Y)
Advanced Modern Hebrew
Prerequisite: HEBR 202, or equivalent, or instructor permission.
This course focuses on the conjugation of weak, or hollow verbs, and the passive of all conjugations. It also continues the study of subordinate clauses with special attention to adverbial clauses and their use. Texts for the course, which form the basis for class discussion in Hebrew and exercises in Hebrew composition, are drawn from various genres.

PERS 101, 102 - (4) (Y)
Elementary Persian
Prerequisite for PERS 102: PERS 101, or equivalent, or instructor permission.
Introductory language sequence focusing on reading, writing, comprehending, and speaking modern Persian through audio- lingual methods. Persian grammar is introduced through sentence patterns in the form of dialogues and monologues.

PERS 201, 202 - (4) (Y)
Intermediate Persian
Prerequisite: PERS 102, or equivalent, or instructor permission.
Each course focuses on the development of reading, writing, and speaking skills. Special attention is paid to reading comprehension using selections from classical and modern Persian prose and poetry, preparing students for advanced studies in Indo-Persian language and literature.

PERS 301/501 - (3) (IR)
Readings in Modern Persian Poetry
Prerequisite: PERS 202, or equivalent, or instructor permission.
Study of works by major and some minor poets of the twentieth century. The form and content of 'New Poetry' is discussed as distinguishing features of twentieth-century Persian poetry in contrast with those of classical Persian poetry. Emphasizes the themes of modern poetry as reflections of Iranian society.

PERS 323 - (3) (Y)
Introduction to Classical Persian Literature
Prerequisite: PERS 202, or equivalent, or instructor permission.
A comprehensive, historical introduction to Persian poetry and prose from the 10th to the 18th centuries. Emphasizing the history and development of Persian poetry and prose, this advanced-level language course introduces various formal elements of Persian literary tradition. It analyzes literary texts and explores the linguistic structure, fine grammatical points, and syntactic intricacies of classical Persian.

PERS 324 - (3) (Y)
Introduction to ModernPersian Literature
Prerequisite: PERS 202, or equivalent, or instructor permission.
This course addresses the development of modern(ist) trends in Persian literature, emphasizing historical and socio-political factors. Exemplar modern poems, stories, and essays are read in the original, then explained and critically evaluated. Defines and discusses significant ideas, ideologies, movements, trends, milieus, social backgrounds, etc., out of which modern Persian literature emerged.

PERS 302/502 - (3) (IR)
Readings in Modern Persian Prose Fiction
Prerequisite: PERS 202, or equivalent, or instructor permission.
Selected readings from the works of major writers of the century. Discusses the development of modern Persian fiction as it reflects a changing society. Improves reading ability in Persian and familiarizes students with Iran, its people, and its culture.

PERS 493, 494 - (1-3) (Y)
Independent Study in Persian

PETR 321/521 - (3) (IR)
Persian Literature in Translation
Reading from the works of major figures in classical Persian literature, especially Rudaki, Ferdowsi, Khayyam, Attar, Mowlavi, Sa'adi, and Hafez, as well as the most important minor writers of each period. Emphasizes the role of the Ma'shuq (the beloved), Mamduh (the praised one), and Ma'bud (the worshiped one) in classical verse, as well as the use of allegory and similar devices in both prose and verse. Taught in English.

PETR 322/522 - (3) (IR)
Twentieth-Century Persian Literature in Translation
Introduces modern Persian literature in the context of Iranian society and civilization. Lectures and discussions follow the development of modern Persian poetry and prose, and trace the influence of Western and other literature, as well as Iranian literary and cultural heritage, on the works of contemporary Iranian writers. Facilitates understanding of contemporary Iran, especially its people, both individually and collectively, with their particular problems and aspirations in the twentieth-century world. Taught in English.


Economics

ECON 451 - (3) (Y)
Economic Development
Prerequisite: ECON 202 and 301 or instructor permission.
Studies the peculiar problems of economic growth in underdeveloped countries. Emphasizes public policies for both the countries themselves and the more developed countries and international agencies.


History

HIEU 317 - (3) (IR)
Eastern Christianity
Surveys the history of Christianity in the Byzantine world and the Middle East from late antiquity (age of emperor Justinian) until the fall of Constantinople. Emphasizes developments in theology, spirituality and art, and the relation of Christianity to Islam. Considers Eastern Christianity in modern times.

HIME 100 - (3) (IR)
Introductory Seminar in Middle East History
Introduces the study of history intended for first- or second-year students. Seminars involve reading, discussing, and writing about different historical topics and periods, and emphasize the enhancement of critical and communication skills. Not more than two Introductory Seminars may be counted toward the major in history.

HIME 201 - (4) (Y)
History of the Middle East and North Africa, ca. 570-ca. 1500
Explores the the historical evolution of the Middle East and North Africa from the birth of Islam to the establishment of the Ottoman state in the early 16th century. Topics include the Fertile Crescent, Egypt,  Mesopotamia, Iran/Persia, and the Arabian Peninsula; Andalusia (Muslim Spain); North Africa, Anatolia; Central Asia; Islam as a religious system, way of life, and world civilization;  and the historical development of cultural, social, legal, and political Islamic institutions.

HIME 202 - (4) (Y)
History of the Middle East and North Africa, ca. 1500-Present
As a continuation of HIME 201 (which is not a prerequisite), this course surveys the historical evolution of the Middle East and North Africa, i.e., the region stretching from Morocco to Afghanistan, and from the Balkans and Anatolia to the Arabian Peninsula. Topics include the main political configurations of the area from the birth of Islam until the Mongol aftermath; the rise of the gunpowder Empires   of the 16th century; the Ottoman and Safavid (Iran) states; and the modern nation-state systems of the present century, ca. 1980. The dominant political, religious, economic, social, and cultural features of Middle Eastern peoples and societies are examined, as are relationships between the region and other parts of Eurasia, particularly Western Europe.

HIME 319 - (3) (IR)
Christianity and Islam
Studies Christianity in the Middle East in the centuries after the rise of Islam. Cross-listed as RELC 329.

HIME 401 - (4) (Y)
Seminar in Middle East and North Africa History
The major seminar is a small class (not more than 15 students) intended primarily but not exclusively for history majors who have completed two or more courses relevant to the topic of the seminar. The work of the seminar results primarily in the preparation of a substantial (ca. 25 pp. in standard format) research paper. Some restrictions and prerequisites apply to enrollment. See a history advisor or the director of undergraduate studies.

HIME 402 - (4) (Y)
Colloquium in Middle East History
The major colloquium is a small class (not more than 15 students) intended primarily but not exclusively for history majors who have completed two or more courses relevant to the topics of the colloquium. Colloquia are most frequently offered in areas of history where access to source materials or linguistic demands make seminars especially difficult. Students in colloquia prepare about 25 pages of written work distributed among various assignments. Some restrictions and prerequisites apply to enrollment. See a history advisor or the director of undergraduate studies.

HIME 403 - (4) (Y)
Topics in Middle Eastern History
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Topics courses are small, discussion-oriented classes available to any student with sufficient background and interest in a particular field of historical study. Offered irregularly, they are open to majors or non-majors.

HIME 404 - (1-3) (Y)
Independent Study in Middle Eastern History
In exceptional circumstances and with the permission of a faculty member any student may undertake a rigorous program of independent study designed to explore a subject not currently being taught or to expand upon regular offerings. Independent Study projects may not be used to replace regularly scheduled classes. Open to majors or non-majors.

HIME 502 - (3) (IR)
Revolution, Islam, and Gender in the Middle East
Prerequisite: One course in Middle Eastern history or politics, or instructor permission.
Comparative study of revolution in 20th-century Turkey, Egypt, Algeria, and Iran, with particular reference to colonial and post-colonial class, religion, and gender movements.

HIME 503 - (3) (Y)
Multiculturalism in the Ottoman Empire
Study of how a large empire governed a diverse population, between 1453 and 1918, from the perspective of concerns about recent nationalist, racial and ethnic conflicts in modern nation states. Course first examines how the Ottomans managed relations between ethnic and religious groups to 1750. Course then examines reasons for increased communal conflict after 1750, and Ottoman efforts to re-engineer relations among groups along liberal, constitutional lines.


Politics

PLCP 212 - (3) (Y)
The Politics of Developing Areas
Surveys patterns of government and politics in non-Western political systems. Topics include political elites, sources of political power, national integration, economic development, and foreign penetration.

CFCP 313 - (3) (Y)
Political Economy of Development
Prerequisite: PLIR 205 or instructor permission.
Examines the political prerequisites (and impediments) to economic development, focusing on agricultural exporters in the 19th century and manufactured goods exporters in the 20th century. Draws on empirical material from North and South American, Europe, Asia and Africa.

PLCP 341 - (3) (Y)
Politics of the Middle East and North Africa
Prerequisite: Some background in comparative politics and/or history of the Middle East.
Introduces contemporary political systems of the region stretching from Morocco to Iran.

PLCP 414 - (3) (IR)
Democracy and Dictatorship
Prerequisite: One course in PLCP or instructor permission.
Surveys and critically evaluates theories of origins of democratic and authoritarian governments, and the causes of subsequent transitions to, and away from, democratic regimes.

PLCP 506 - (3) (Y)
Political Development and Developmental Politics
Prerequisite: One course in PLCP or instructor permission.
Critical examination and analysis of the basic theories of political development. Emphasizes development of the modern nation state in Europe and the Developing World from 1400-2000.

PLCP 525 - (3) (Y)
Politics of Economic Reform
Prerequisite: Previous course in PLCP, PLIR, or economics is recommended.
A wave of economic change has swept across countries from Argentina to Zimbabwe over the last 15 years. The unfolding of these changes has been structured by and, in turn, has shaped the politics of the countries in which they have occurred. Formulates an analytical framework for understanding the politics of economic reform. Studies cases in Latin America, Africa, Asia, and Eastern Europe.

PLCP 541 - (3) (Y)
Islam and Democracy in the Middle East
Prerequisite: PLCP 341 or equivalent.
Studies the prospects for democratic transitions in Middle Eastern states, emphasizing the role of Islamic political movements.

PLIR 365 - (3) (Y)
International Relations of the Middle East
Prerequisite: Some background in international relations or the history of the Middle East.
Studies the emergence of the contemporary inter-state system in the Middle East; the important role played by outside powers, especially the United States; the effect of the Cold War on the region; the persistent conflict between Israel and its Arab neighbors and the efforts to reach peace; and the difficulty of constructing a stable order in the Persian Gulf.


Religious Studies
RELA 390 - (3) (O)
Islam in Africa
Prerequisite: RELA 275, RELI 207, RELI 208, or instructor permission.
Historical and topical introduction to Islam in Africa. Cross-listed as RELI 390.

RELI 207 - (3) (Y)
Classical Islam
Studies the Irano-Semitic background, Arabia, Muhammad and the Qur'an, the Hadith, law and theology, duties and devotional practices, sectarian developments, and Sufism.

RELI 208 - (3) (Y)
Islam in the Modern Age
Studies the 19th and 20th centuries in the Arab world, Turkey, and the Sub-Continent of India, emphasizing reform movements, secularization, and social and cultural change.

RELI 311 - (3) (E)
Muhammad and the Qur'an
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
Systematic reading of the Qur'an in English, with an examination of the prophet's life and work.

RELI 312 - (3) (O)
Sufism
Prerequisite: RELI 207 or instructor permission.
Investigates some major figures, themes, and schools of Islamic mysticism.

RELI 367 - (3) (E)
Religion and Politics in Islam
Historical and topical survey of the roots and genesis of the religion, and political conceptions operating in the Islamic world today.

RELI 390 - (3) (O)
Islam in Africa
Prerequisite: RELA 275, RELI 207, RELI 208, or instructor permission.
Historical and topical introduction to Islam in Africa. Cross-listed as RELA 390.

RELI 540 - (3) (Y)
Seminar in Islamic Theology
Prerequisite: RELI 207 or instructor permission.
Studies Islamic theology from its origins through the 14th century. The Sunni and Shi'ite traditions are discussed in alternate years.

RELI 541 - (3) (IR)
Islamic Theology:  The Shi'ite Creed
Studies the Twelver Shi'ite Religious thought in comparison with other Shi'ite and Sunni sects.

RELI 542 - (3) (IR)
War and Peace in Islam: A Comparative Ethics Approach
Studies Islamic notions of holy war and peace as they relate to statecraft and political authority in Muslim history.

RELJ 111, 112 - (4) (O)
Introduction to Biblical Hebrew
Studies the essentials of grammar, syntax, and vocabulary. Includes readings of narrative portions of the Old Testament.

RELJ 121 - (3) (Y)
Old Testament/Hebrew Scriptures
Studies the history, literature, and theology of ancient Israel and early Judaism in the light of the religious writings of Israel (Old Testament).

RELJ 201, 202 - (3) (Y)
Advanced Readings in Biblical Hebrew
Prerequisite: RELJ 111 and RELJ 112.
Advanced readings in the prose narratives of the Bible. Emphasizes vocabulary, morphology, and syntax. Some introduction to the problems of interpretation.

RELJ 203 - (3) (Y)
The Judaic Tradition
Introduces the world view and way of life of classical Rabbinic Judaism.

RELJ 307 - (3) (O)
Beliefs and Ethics After the Holocaust
Prerequisite: Any religious studies, history, or philosophy course, or instructor permission.
Examines how theologians and ethicists have responded to the human catastrophe of the Nazi Holocaust, 1933-45. Readings include twentieth-century reflections on the Holocaust, and previous Jewish and Christian responses to catastrophe from Biblical times through the nineteenth- and twentieth-century pogroms in eastern Europe.

RELJ 309 - (3) (E)
Israelite Prophecy
Surveys Israelite prophecy based on the prophetic books of the Old Testament.

RELJ 322 - (3) (Y)
Judaism and Zionism
Studies the complex relationship between Judaism'the sacred tradition of the Jews'and Zionism'the modern ideology of Jewish national revival.

RELJ 330 - (3) (Y)
The Jewish Mystical Tradition
Historical study of the Jewish mystical tradition, emphasizing the persistent themes of the tradition as represented in selected mystical texts.

RELJ 331 - (3) (Y)
Jewish Law
Studies the structure and content of Jewish law in terms of its normative function, its historical background, its theological and philosophical principles, and its role in contemporary society both Jewish and general.

RELJ 334 - (3) (Y)
Jewish Medical Ethics
Studies the classical Jewish sources as applied by contemporary Jewish thinkers to some of the issues raised by current advances in medical treatment, such as abortion, euthanasia, medical experimentation, etc.

RELJ 335 - (3) (Y)
Jewish Social Ethics
Studies major social issues such as war and peace, ecology, crime and punishment, as discussed by ancient, medieval and modern Jewish ethicists.

RELJ 336 - (3) (Y)
Judaism and Christianity
Studies the relationship between Judaism and Christianity from the origins of Christianity as a Jewish sect through the conflicts of the Middle Ages and modernity; and current views of the interrelationship.

RELJ 337 - (3) (Y)
Modern Movements in Judaism
Studies the modern religious movements in Judaism including Orthodox, Conservative, Reform, as well as Zionism, both secular and religious, with an emphasis on their theological and philosophical assertions and historical backgrounds.

RELJ 391 - (3) (Y)
Women and the Bible
Prerequisite: Any religious studies course or instructor permission.
Surveys passages in the Old Testament/ Hebrew Bible and the New Testament that focus specifically on women or use feminine imagery. Considers various readings of these passages, including traditional Jewish and Christian, historical-critical, and feminist interpretations. Cross-listed as RELC 391.

RELJ 505 - (3) (SI)
Judaism in Antiquity
Description and analysis of representative systems of Judaic religion which flourished in Palestine, Egypt, and Mesopotamia from 500 B.C. to 200 A.D.

RELJ 522 - (3) (SI)
The Shaping of the Rabbinic Tradition
Seminar investigating specific aspects of the pre-modern development of Rabbinic Judaism, e.g., 'the holy man, mysticism and society, canon and exegesis, and law as theology.'

RELJ 523 - (3) (O)
Modern Jewish Thought: From Phenomenology to Scripture
Studies postmodern trajectories in the Jewish philosophies of Rosenzweig and Levinas, with comparative readings in Derrida and Ricoeur. Includes supplementary studies of Descartes, Kant, Husserl, Cohen, Buber, and Lyotard.

RELJ 528 - (3) (SI)
Seminar in Israelite Religion
Advanced study in a selected aspect of the religion of ancient Israel.

RELJ 529 - (3) (SI)
Seminar in Hebrew Bible
In-depth study of a selected corpus of literature, specific book of the Hebrew Bible, or pervasive theme.

RELJ 594 - (3) (SI)
Judaism and Kantian Philosophy
Prerequisite: Courses in philosophy or Jewish thought, or instructor permission; reading knowledge of German helpful.
Studies the interaction of the philosophy of Immanuel Kant and Jewish theology in the 19th century and early 20th century, primarily concentrating on the thought of the German-Jewish thinker Hermann Cohen (1842-1918).


Studies in Women and Gender
SWAG 312 - (3) (Y)
Women and Islam