Junko Kato

Professor of Political Science
Graduate School of Law and Political Science
7-3-1 Hongo Bunkyo-ku
Tokyo 113-0033 JAPAN

Tel: 81-3-5841-3148
Fax: 81-3-5841-3174
Email: katoj@j.u-tokyo.ac.jp

Professional Preparation

B.A. 1984 University of Tokyo Political Science
M.A. 1986 University of Tokyo Political Science
M. A. and M. Phil. 1989 Yale University Political Science
Ph.D. 1992 Yale University Political Science

Appointments

2003-date Professor of Political Science, Graduate School of Law and Political Science, The University of Tokyo
1993-2003 Associate Professor of Political Science, The University of Tokyo
1996-1997 Associate, Center for International Affairs, Harvard University
1992-1993 Visiting Lecturer of Political Science, Yale University
1996-date Advisory Board of British Journal of Political Science
1999-date Associate (Founding) Editor of Japanese Journal of Political Science
1998-date Editor of Leviathan (Tokyo based academic journal in political science)

Publications: directly related

Kato, Junko and Michael Laver, “Dynamic Approaches to Government Formation and the Generic Instability of Decisive Structures in Japan,” Electoral Studies, vol. 20, no.4 (December 2001).

Kato, Junko. “When the Party Breaks Up: Exit and Voice among Japanese Legislators,” American Political Science Review, vol. 92, no.4 (December 1998): 857-870.

Kato, Junko and Michael Laver, “Theories of Government Formation and the 1996 General Election in Japan,” Party Politics, vol. 4, no. 2 (1998): 229-252.

Kato, Junko and Aldo Di Virgilio, “Factionalisme, Coalitions et Fragmentation Politique,” Revue Française de Science Politique, vol. 51, no. 4 (2001): 587-619.

Kato, Junko, Michael Laver and Kenneth Shepsle. "Nihon ni okeru Renritsu Seiken no Keisei (Portfolio Allocation and Government Formation in Europe and Japan)," Leviathan, 19,(Autumn 1996), pp. 63-85.

Publications: other significant

Kato, Junko. Regressive Taxation and the Welfare State: Path Dependency and Policy Diffusion. New York: Cambridge University Press. 2003.

Kato, Junko. The Problem of Bureaucratic Rationality: Tax Politics in Japan. Princeton: Princeton University Press. 1994.

Kato, Junko. "Rationality and Institution in Politics: Three Varieties of Neo-Institutionalism," British Journal of Political Science, vol. 26, part 4 (1996), pp.553-582.

Kato, Junko. "Public Pension Reforms in the United States and Japan: A Study of Comparative Public Policy," Comparative Political Studies, vol. 24, no. 1 (1991), pp. 100-126.

Kato, Junko. Seikankankei to Zeiseikaikaku. Tokyo: The University of Tokyo Press. 1997.

Synergistic Activities

Database development for “When the Party Breaks Up: Exit and Voice among Japanese Legislators,” American Political Science Review, vol. 92, no.4 (December 1998): 857-870. I have collected the data on politicians' behavior focused on their electoral and policy backgrounds as well as party affiliations. I have also shared this data base with other scholars who have also studied on the party splits in Japan.

I am now developing a database of factional affiliation and allocation of ministerial posts among the incumbent politicians from 1959 to 1992 in Japan.

Collaborators & Other Affiliations

Collaborators and Co-Editors

Michael Laver, Trinity College (Dublin)

Carol Mershon, Department of Politics, University of Virginia

Bo Rothstein, Department of Political Science, Gøterborg University (Sweden)

Graduate and Postdoctoral Advisors

David Cameron, Department of Political Science, Yale University

David Mayhew, Department of Political Science, Yale University

Mike Mochizuki, The Elliott School of International Affairs, George Washington University

Susan Rose-Ackerman, Law School, Yale University

Thesis advisor to:

Nam Kim-John, University of Tohoku, Japan

Lin Chen-Wei, University of Hokkaido, Japan

Postdoctoral sponsor to:

Total number of graduate students and postdocotral scholars advised for the last five years: 15