Consequences


 

This works best if students bring in versions of their problem statements with the consequences deleted. Part of the purpose of this exercise is to demonstrate that consequences change depending on the imagined reader.



Consequences
 
 
1. Summarize the problem.

__________________________________________________________________________


2. Brainstorm a list of at least three groups of people whom this problem will affect: for example, infants, teenagers, and the elderly; or Virginians, Californians, and the French.

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________
 
 
3. Fill in the consequences for each group:
 
a. Why should ______________ care about this problem? (How will it affect them?)
Costs (What bad things will happen if they continue to believe in the status quo?):
 
 
Benefits (What good things will happen if they start to believe in the resolution?):
 
 
b. Why should ___________ care about this problem? (How will it affect them?)

Costs (What bad things will happen if they continue to believe in the status quo?):
 
 

Benefits (What good things will happen if they start to believe in the resolution?):
 
 

c. Why should ___________ care about this problem? (How will it affect them?)

Costs (What bad things will happen if they continue to believe in the status quo?):
 
 

Benefits (What good things will happen if they start to believe in the resolution?):