Introduction Workshop 3


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Introduction Workshop

Note: Fill out this worksheet as completely as possible. When you have finished the worksheets, you and your partner should discuss what you’ve found, what needs to be improved, and what was done well. You and your partner will keep these worksheets, and you should use them as you revise your introductions and write your papers.

Part One

I. First, look at your own introduction. Then fill in the blanks:

My name is _______________________

I am working on _______________________________________________________________

because I want to show you ______________________________________________________

__________________________ in order to explain to you ______________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

II. Parts of the Problem Statement

Find the elements of a prototypical problem statement in your introduction.

1) What is the status quo?

 

 

2) What is the conceptual problem? (What question does your paper ask? What are the consequences — to the reader — of leaving this question unanswered?)

 

 

3) What is your answer? (Do you offer a solution or tentative solution? Is it in the Launching Point?)

 

 

 

III. Criteria for Evaluating Thesis Statements

Now, ask yourself the following questions about your thesis:

1) Is it supportable? (Is it too broad? Do you have enough evidence to support your thesis/ solution? Can you substantiate this thesis in a 3-4 page essay?)

If not, how would you change it?

 

2) Is it debatable? (Could a reasonable person disagree with your argument? Are you stating the obvious?)

If not, how would you change it?

 

 

 

 

 

3) Is it precise? (Is your language clear and specific? Does the reader get a good idea of where your argument is going to go?)

If not, how would you change it?

 

 

 

 

 

4) So what? (Why should your topic matter to your reader?)

 

 

 

Part Two

I. Now turn to your partner’s introduction. Exchange worksheets (so that this worksheet only deals with your own introduction, first from your perspective, then from the perspective of your partner.) After reading your partner’s essay carefully, fill in the blanks:

My partner’s name is _______________________

He/ she is working on ___________________________________________________________

because he/ she wants to show you _________________________________________________

__________________________ in order to explain to you ______________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

II. Parts of the Problem Statement

Now, find the parts of your partner’s problem statement:

1) What is the status quo?

 

 

2) What is the conceptual problem? (What question does the paper ask? What are the consequences — to the reader — of leaving this question unanswered?)

 

 

3) What is your answer? (Does your partner offer a solution or tentative solution? Is it in the Launching Point?)

 

 

 

III. Criteria for Evaluating Thesis Statements

Now, ask yourself the following questions about your partner’s thesis:

1) Is it supportable? (Is it too broad? Is there enough evidence to support the thesis/ solution? Can this thesis be substantiated in a 3-4 page essay?)

If not, how would you change it?

 

 

 

 

 

2) Is it debatable? (Could a reasonable person disagree with the argument? Does it state the obvious?)

If not, how would you change it?

 

 

 

 

 

3) Is it precise? (Is the language clear and specific? Does the reader get a good idea of where the argument is going to go?)

If not, how would you change it?

 

 

 

 

 

4) So what? (Why should this topic matter to the reader?)