MWF Student Syllabus


ENWR 110, Fall 2001

Course Requirements | Course Readings | Course Schedule

 

Section 38: Biography and Autobiography

Ms. Carrie Lindley

MWF 1-1:50, Bryan 332

caj4a@virginia.edu

Office: 233 Bryan Hall; Hours: MF 2-3 and by appointment

Mailbox in English Department Office, 219 Bryan Hall

Required Texts:

Diana Hacker, The Bedford Handbook, 5th edition

Helen Fielding, Bridget Jones’s Diary

Other course materials will be on electronic reserve at the class web site:

http://toolkit.virginia.edu/ENWR110-38

Background:

ENWR 110 is an intensive writing workshop that prepares entering students to write at a college level. Your writing will be the central focus of this course. The goal of this course is to help you develop an understanding of the writing process, from concept to draft to revision, as well as of the principles of good writing: focus, organization, style, and mechanics. Throughout the semester you will also be asked to develop your critical reading skills, and I will expect you to approach all of our texts with your brains fully engaged.

Our Theme:

I have chosen "Biography and Autobiography" as the theme for this course. In this class, we will read excerpts from several biographies and autobiographies, as well as several biographical "Profiles" from The New Yorker. We will also read the fictional autobiography Bridget Jones’s Diary, view an episode of A&E Biography, and select and watch a biographical film. Throughout the semester we will consider both how we construct the story of a life, and how we tell stories about ourselves. How true are these stories? How accurate are these narratives and narrators? What combinations of fact and fiction do biographies and autobiographies employ? How do these stories change when they are told through images, rather than through only words? All of our assigned readings will deal with aspects of these questions and this theme. Your papers will also use this theme as their starting point. I hope that this will allow us to maintain a conversation about our theme through in-class discussions and your papers for the duration of the semester.

Course Requirements:

Written Assignments: You will produce four essays over the course of the semester. The essays will be spaced at 2-3 week intervals. I will provide detailed information for each essay later in the semester, but here are the basic requirements for your papers:

Draft: This should be a full-length, totally conceived, mechanically clean essay which meets the following criteria:

  1. It has a main idea, expressed in a clear thesis statement.
  2. The thesis is developed in coherent paragraphs and supported with concrete evidence.
  3. The paper must be typed and double-spaced.
  4. The paper must satisfy the assigned length requirement (usually 3-5 pages).

When grading your papers, I will place check marks in the margin to mark mechanical errors (problems with grammar or spelling). When I return your papers, you will need to look at these marks, discover your errors, and correct them. You must turn in a list of these corrections by the next class period.

Revisions: After the submission of each draft, you will make significant revisions to your paper based on class discussion, my comments, and your further thought on the subject. Papers #1 and #2 will have formal revisions, which you will resubmit to me. The revision you hand in must be a substantial reworking of your draft. It is not enough to correct mechanical errors. To receive credit for your revision you must make one major "global" revision and three smaller "local" revisions. A global revision includes reformulating your thesis, restating one of your reasons, rewriting the problem statement in your introduction, adding or altering evidence, etc. A global revision will impact your argument. Local revisions include rewriting transitions, improving sentences, clarifying your conclusion or introduction, etc. Local revisions will impact the paragraph in which they are made.

Workshops: Because your writing is at the center of this course, we will devote several class periods to the discussion of your essays. In these writing workshops you will offer constructive criticism and suggestions about each other’s writing. By looking at the writing of your classmates, you will learn to identify problems in your own writing. You can then use these insights, along with the ideas and comments of your classmates, to revise your essays. Everyone will have at least one paper workshopped during the semester. (You will sign up for a specific date later.)

Portfolio: You should continue revising all of your papers until the end of the semester, when you will submit your two best essays into a final portfolio. This portfolio should be between 8 and 10 pages in length. I will use this portfolio to evaluate your progress and to determine your course grade.

Participation: Since our goal is to learn from one another, your participation in the daily workings of this course is essential. You are expected to contribute to class discussions (of readings, films, and writing), participate in workshops and in group assignments, and complete short individual assignments (creative writing, e-mail reflections and questions, etc.). Your written work (drafts and revisions) constitutes another aspect of your participation, and will be considered when a participation grade is assigned. Finally, you will be asked to give a presentation to your classmates later in the semester.

 

Course Expectations:

Attendance: You may miss two classes without penalty. Each additional absence will result in a reduction of your final grade by two-thirds of a letter grade (i.e. a final grade of B+ will become a B-). Note: Absences on days that you are scheduled to workshop a paper are unacceptable.

Tardiness: Coming into class late disrupts our work. Consequently, habitual tardiness will not be permitted. Two tardies will count as one absence.

Late Papers: Papers must be handed in during class on the due date. The English Department allows students to turn in two late papers without penalty (this includes both drafts and revisions). Late papers must be handed in at the beginning of the next class period. Your third late paper will result in the reduction of your final grade by one letter grade (i.e. a final grade of B will become a C). Note: Late papers will not be tolerated on days that you are scheduled to workshop a paper.

Evaluation:

I will offer extensive comments on all of your drafts and revisions. Your papers will also be assigned letter grades. Your final grade will consist of the grades on your four papers (40%), the quality of your participation over the course of the semester (30%), and the strength of your final portfolio (30%).

At mid-term we will meet in individual conferences to discuss your progress. At that time I will give you an idea of your course grade and point out your strengths as well as areas for improvement. You will also have an opportunity to ask questions or raise concerns about your work or the course.

You must receive at least a C- to earn credit for this course. If your grade is lower than a C-, you will receive a No Credit and will have to repeat the course. Once you have passed the course the No Credit will be removed from your transcript.

Additional Resources:

Office Hours: Please feel free to stop by my office during office hours, or to e-mail me for an appointment, if you have any concerns about past or upcoming assignments or the class in general.

Class E-mail List: Occasionally you will be asked to send an e-mail to the class e-mail list — ENWR110-38@toolkit.virginia.edu. This e-mail will go to every student in our class, as well as to me. You can also use the class e-mail list to ask your classmates a question about your writing, your assignment, a book you’re trying to find, etc.

Conferences: All students must meet with me, once during the first few weeks of the semester, and again at mid-term.

The Writing Center: I may ask you, or you may want, to meet with a tutor at the Writing Center. The Writing Center is located in 314 Bryan Hall and is staffed by graduate students in the English Department, many of whom have taught ENWR 110. The Writing Center is open M-F 9-5 and M-Th 7-10. To make an appointment stop by the Center or call 924-6678.

 

Course Readings

1) hooks, bell. "writing autobiography." Women, Autobiography, Theory: A Reader. Eds. Sidonie Smith and Julia Watson. U of Wisconsin P, 1998. 429-432.

2) McCarthy, Mary. Memories of a Catholic Girlhood. New York: Harcourt, 1957.

-- "To the Reader." 3-27.

-- "Yonder Peasant, Who Is He?" 29-53.

3) Hornby, Nick. Fever Pitch. New York: Riverhead, 1992. (Selections range from 2-6 pages each.)

-- "Introduction"

-- "Home Début"

-- "A Spare Jimmy Husband"

-- "Don Rogers"

-- "England!"

-- "Social History"

-- "A Matter of Life and Death"

-- "Graduation Day"

-- "The Whole Package"

-- "Carol Blackburn"

-- "Just Like a Woman"

-- "Filling a Hole"

-- "Same Old Arsenal"

-- "A Male Fantasy"

-- "No Apology Necessary"

-- "Tyranny"

-- "The Greatest Moment Ever"

-- "A Sixties Revival"

4) Woolf, Virginia. A Moment’s Liberty. London: Hogarth Press, 1990.

-- "1915." 1-13.

5) Frank, Anne. The Diary of a Young Girl. New York: Doubleday, 1995.

-- "Foreward." v-viii.

-- 1-39, 120-34, 158-9, 250-63, 314-19.

6) Fielding, Helen. Bridget Jones’s Diary. New York: Penguin, 1996.

7) Middlebrook, Diane Wood. "Postmodernism and the Biography." Revealing Lives: Autobiography, Biography, and Gender. Eds. Susan Groag Bell and Marilyn Yalom. New York: SUNY Press, 1990. 155-65.

8) Middlebrook, Diane Wood. Anne Sexton: A Biography. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1991.

-- Title Page, Contents, Prefatory Materials, 3-13.

9) Bergreen, Laurence. Capone: The Man and the Era. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1994.

-- Title Page, Contents, Prefatory Materials, 15-21.

10) Acocella, Joan. "The Soloist." Life Stories: Profiles From The New Yorker. Ed. David Remnick. New York: Random House, 2000. 61-78.

11) Orlean, Susan. "Show Dog." Life Stories: Profiles From The New Yorker. Ed. David Remnick. New York: Random House, 2000. 496-503.

12) Malcolm, Janet. "Forty-One False Starts." Life Stories: Profiles From The New Yorker. Ed. David Remnick. New York: Random House, 2000. 504-30.

 

CLASS SCHEDULE

Please be sure to keep this schedule handy. It is important that you refer to the schedule regularly, since it contains detailed descriptions of what we will be doing this semester.

Note on Assignments: Unless otherwise stated, all assignments should be typed and double-spaced.

 

Week One

Wednesday 8/29

Introduction to the Course

On-going Assignment: For the next five weeks, our class will focus on the uses and forms of autobiography. I want you to experience some of autobiography’s uses, and one of its forms, by keeping a journal or diary. This assignment begins today, and ends on Friday 9/28 when we move on to a discussion of biography. In order to complete this assignment, you should make at least three journal entries each week. Each week’s entries should total 2-3 pages of writing. You need not type your entries, and you need not write on a specific topic or theme. Your entries do not need to mention this class, your readings, or your assignments. I want you to write about what you think is worth writing down on the page. On occasion, I may ask for volunteers to share from their journals, but participation in this aspect of the journal experience is optional. At the end of the five weeks, I will look at what you have written. If there is anything in your journal that you do not want me to read, you can fold over that page, or those pages, and I will not read it/ them. Ultimately, I am only interested in your completion of the assignment.

Friday 8/31

Reading: None

Assignment: Write a 1-2 page personal narrative about your worst childhood injury. Imagine that you are recording your life history or autobiography from your current perspective as a college student. Use the story of your worst childhood injury to write an introduction to your autobiography. Some suggestions for your narrative: (1) Explain what you were doing in the moments before the injury occurred; (2) Discuss/ describe the injury and its consequences; (3) Tell us how you overcame the injury; (4) Finally, remember that this is the introduction to a history of your life. Connect your injury to the rest of your (yet to be written) story.

Class: We will discuss problem statements and workshop your personal narratives.

 

 

Week Two

Monday 9/3

Reading: bell hooks, "writing autobiography"

Assignment: Write a 1-2 page response to hooks’s essay. In this response you should (a) give a brief account of hooks’s opinions on autobiography, and (b) consider how these opinions relate to your own. What is hooks’s message? Do you agree or disagree with her? Why?

Class: We will discuss hooks and your responses to her essay. We will also experiment with personal narratives and fairy tales.

Wednesday 9/5

Reading: Mary McCarthy, Memories of a Catholic Girlhood (selections)

Assignment: (1) If your last name begins with A through M, this assignment is for you. If your last name begins with N through Z, see the assignment for Monday 9/10. This assignment is due before Tuesday evening at 7:00 PM. Post three questions about Memories of a Catholic Girlhood to the class e-mail address: ENWR110-38@toolkit.virginia.edu. (Submissions to this address are sent automatically to everyone in the class.) These should be real questions — i.e., questions you don’t have answers to but believe are important to pursue. These questions should also relate to the theme and concerns of this course. For each question, write a paragraph explaining why the question is worth asking and suggesting possible ways to begin answering it. Note: E-mail submissions should observe the rules of spelling and grammar. (2) Before class on Wednesday, everyone should read all of the questions and paragraphs posted by your classmates.

Class: We will use your questions and paragraphs to frame our discussion of Memories of a Catholic Girlhood. We will also talk about Tangible and Conceptual Problems.

Friday 9/7

Reading: None

Assignment: Select one of the questions submitted by your classmates on McCarthy’s Memories of a Catholic Girlhood. Think of this question as a conceptual problem. Imagine that you will be writing an essay that solves this problem/ answers this question. Write a 1-2 page introduction to this imagined essay. In your introduction, you need to discuss the status quo, this question, and the consequences of not answering this question. You should also include an answer, or tentative answer, to the question you have selected. This answer is your thesis.

Class: We will workshop your introductions in the context of a discussion on how to write an introduction for an academic essay.

 

 

Week Three

Monday 9/10

Reading: Nick Hornby, Fever Pitch (selections)

Assignment: (1) If your last name begins with N through Z, this assignment is for you. This assignment is due before Sunday evening at 7:00 PM. Post three questions about Fever Pitch (or about connections between Fever Pitch and Memories of a Catholic Girlhood) to the class e-mail address: ENWR110-38@toolkit.virginia.edu. (Submissions to this address are sent automatically to everyone in the class.) These should be real questions — i.e., questions you don’t have answers to but believe are important to pursue. These questions should also relate to the theme and concerns of this course. For each question, write a paragraph explaining why the question is worth asking and suggesting possible ways to begin answering it. Note: E-mail submissions should observe the rules of spelling and grammar. (2) Before class on Monday, everyone should read all of the questions and paragraphs posted by your classmates.

Class: We will use your questions and paragraphs to frame our discussion of Fever Pitch. We will also talk about the similarities and differences between Hornby’s and McCarthy’s autobiographies.

Wednesday 9/12

Reading: None

Assignment: Select one of the questions submitted by your classmates on Fever Pitch. Think of this question as a conceptual problem. Imagine that you will be writing an essay that solves this problem/ answers this question. Write a 1-2 page introduction to this imagined essay. In your introduction, you need to discuss the status quo, this question, and the consequences of not answering this question. You should also include an answer, or tentative answer, to the question you have selected. This answer is your thesis.

Class: We will workshop your introductions and discuss your first paper. You will also sign-up for paper workshops.

Friday 9/14

Reading: Virginia Woolf, A Moment’s Liberty (selections); Anne Frank, The Diary of a Young Girl (selections)

Assignment: In a one page personal response, compare and contrast these diaries with your own. Some questions/ points of comparison to consider: What events get recorded? What is the proportion of truth and invention? Fact and emotion? What are the chief themes or concerns? Is the diary written for someone else to read or for personal satisfaction? You should bring your journals with you to class.

Class: We will talk about the readings in the context of a discussion about the diary and its similarities to and differences from other forms of autobiography.

 

 

Week Four

Monday 9/17

Reading: Helen Fielding, Bridget Jones’s Diary, pp. 1-74

Assignment: Write a 1-2 page essay in which you compare and contrast one aspect of Bridget Jones’s Diary to another text that we’ve read this semester. Try to focus on something fairly specific: an aspect of style or form, a thematic concern, the role of memory, the position of the narrator, the treatment of events, the handling of time, etc.

Class: We will discuss the opening months of Bridget Jones’s Diary and use your reflections to compare the text to the other autobiographies we’ve read this semester.

Wednesday 9/19

Reading: None

Assignment: Introduction to Paper #1 Due

Class: We will workshop your introductions. We will also discuss the differences between making and having an argument.

Friday 9/21

Reading: Bridget Jones’s Diary, pp. 75-137

Assignment: (1) If your last name begins with A through M, this assignment is for you. If your last name begins with N through Z, see the assignment for Wednesday 9/26. This assignment is due before Thursday evening at 7:00 PM. Post three questions on Bridget Jones’s Diary to the class e-mail address: ENWR110-38@toolkit.virginia.edu. (Submissions to this address are sent automatically to everyone in the class.) These should be real questions — i.e., questions you don’t have answers to but believe are important to pursue. These questions should deal with today’s reading assignment (pp. 75-137), and should also relate to the theme and concerns of this course. Possible question topics include: fact v. fiction, truth and invention, forms of autobiography, purposes of autobiography, stylistic features, thematic concerns, treatment of memory, treatment of events, treatment of time, and treatment of narrative voice. For each question, write a paragraph explaining why the question is worth asking and suggesting possible ways to begin answering it. Note: E-mail submissions should observe the rules of spelling and grammar. (2) Before class on Friday, everyone should read all of the questions and paragraphs posted by your classmates.

Class: We will use your questions and paragraphs to frame our continued discussion of the novel.

 

 

Week Five

Monday 9/24

Reading: None

Assignment: Paper #1 Due

Class: We will workshop Paper #1.

Wednesday 9/26

Reading: Bridget Jones’s Diary, pp. 138-95

Assignment: (1) If your last name begins with N through Z, this assignment is for you. This assignment is due before Tuesday evening at 7:00 PM. Post three questions on Bridget Jones’s Diary to the class e-mail address: ENWR110-38@toolkit.virginia.edu. (Submissions to this address are sent automatically to everyone in the class.) These should be real questions — i.e., questions you don’t have answers to but believe are important to pursue. These questions should deal with today’s reading assignment (pp. 138-95), and should also relate to the theme and concerns of this course. Possible question topics include: fact v. fiction, truth and invention, forms of autobiography, purposes of autobiography, stylistic features, thematic concerns, treatment of memory, treatment of events, treatment of time, and treatment of narrative voice. For each question, write a paragraph explaining why the question is worth asking and suggesting possible ways to begin answering it. Note: E-mail submissions should observe the rules of spelling and grammar. (2) Before class on Wednesday, everyone should read all of the questions and paragraphs posted by your classmates.

Class: We will structure our discussion around the questions that you’ve posed.

Friday 9/28

Reading: Bridget Jones’s Diary, pp. 196-271

Assignment: None

Class: We will finish discussing the novel and the questions you posed concerning it.

Week Six

Monday 10/1

Reading: The Bedford Handbook, pp. 426-53

Assignment: (1) Paper #1 — Corrections and Revision Due (2) Complete Bedford Exercises 32-4 and 33-1.

Class: We will discuss the parts of an argument. We will also talk about Paper #2.

Wednesday 10/3

Reading: None

Assignment: Start thinking about your claim for Paper #2. Write down three potential claims. For each claim, write a paragraph explaining why the claim is worth making and suggesting possible ways to begin supporting it.

Class: We will discuss your claims in the context of a discussion on making and supporting claims.

Friday 10/5

Reading: Diane Wood Middlebrook, "Postmodernism and the Biographer," Anne Sexton: A Biography (selections); Laurence Bergreen, Capone (selections)

Assignment: (1) Claim for Paper #2 Due (2) Write a 1-2 page analysis of the opening paragraphs of one of today’s biographies. Before writing, you should look carefully at all of the material provided by the author in this text (including any prefatory materials such as a table of contents or a prologue). What do you learn in the first few paragraphs? About the subject (i.e., Sexton or Capone)? About the author? Do you have any idea of the approach of the author to the subject? What kind of themes are/ will be emphasized? What kind of events, episodes, materials will be discussed? Can you detect an overall plan or thesis? Can you detect any bias? Be specific.

Class: We will begin our discussion of biography by looking at Middlebrook’s essay and the introductory pages to two biographies — Anne Sexton: A Biography and Capone. We will use your analyses to further this discussion.

 

 

Week Seven

Monday 10/8

Reading: The Bedford Handbook, pp. 584-611

Assignment: (1) Introduction to Paper #2 Due (2) Complete the Bedford Worksheet.

Class: We will workshop your arguments for Paper #2, and we will continue our discussion of biography.

Wednesday 10/10

Reading: Joan Acocella, "The Soloist"

Assignment: Identify three sources for Acocella’s profile of Baryshnikov. In other words, identify three sources of information about Baryshnikov that are used in this text. (As an example, an interview with Baryshnikov is one source of biographical information.) For each source, write a paragraph in which you explain how this material is used, how reliable or unreliable it might be, and how it contributes to the overall portrait. In a final paragraph, try to state the author’s organizing claim — i.e., what "one thing" is she trying to say about Baryshnikov? Does she offer sufficient evidence in support of this claim? What are we supposed to take away from our reading of this profile?

Class: We will discuss the sources you identified and your paragraphs in the context of a discussion of the "profile" as a form of biography. We will also talk about evidence.

Friday 10/12

Reading: None

Assignment: Paper #2 Due

Class: We will workshop Paper #2.

 

 

Week Eight

Monday 10/15

Reading Holiday

Wednesday 10/17

Reading: Susan Orlean, "Show Dog"

Assignment: (1) If your last name begins with N through Z, this assignment is for you. If your last name begins with A through M, see the assignment for Friday 10/19. This assignment is due before Tuesday evening at 7:00 PM. Post three questions on Susan Orlean’s "Show Dog" to the class e-mail address: ENWR110-38@toolkit.virginia.edu. (Submissions to this address are sent automatically to everyone in the class.) These should be real questions — i.e., questions you don’t have answers to but believe are important to pursue. These questions should relate to the reading, as well as to the theme and concerns of this course. For each question, write a paragraph explaining why the question is worth asking and suggesting possible ways to begin answering it. Note: E-mail submissions should observe the rules of spelling and grammar. (2) Before class on Wednesday, everyone should read all of the questions and paragraphs posted by your classmates.

Class: We will discuss your questions, the balance of truth and invention in biography, and the problematic nature of the biographical subject (here, a dog).

Friday 10/19

Reading: Janet Malcolm, "Forty-One False Starts"

Assignment: (1) If your last name begins with A through M, this assignment is for you. This assignment is due before Thursday evening at 7:00 PM. Post three questions on Janet Malcolm’s "Forty-One False Starts" to the class e-mail address: ENWR110-38@toolkit.virginia.edu. (Submissions to this address are sent automatically to everyone in the class.) These should be real questions — i.e., questions you don’t have answers to but believe are important to pursue. These questions should relate to the reading, as well as to the theme and concerns of this course. For each question, write a paragraph explaining why the question is worth asking and suggesting possible ways to begin answering it. Note: E-mail submissions should observe the rules of spelling and grammar. (2) Before class on Friday, everyone should read all of the questions and paragraphs posted by your classmates.

Class: We will talk about Malcolm’s "false starts" and we will return to our discussion of introductions (Anne Sexton and Capone) and organizing claims.

 

 

Week Nine

Monday 10/22

Assignment: Imagine that you are writing a biography of someone you know. For this assignment, you should select a friend or family member as your biographical subject. Decide what you want to say about this person. What about their life do you want to emphasize? This theme or main point will become your organizing claim. Once you have selected your claim, you should outline the argument for your imagined biography. What events or episodes from your subject’s life illustrate your claim? Which aspects of your person will you explore at length? Your argument outline should include your claim, five reasons, three pieces of evidence for each reason, one warrant for each reason and evidence section, and three pieces of acknowledgment and response. Although you will submit this assignment in outline form, you may find it necessary to explain your reasons and evidence in brief paragraphs or, at the least, in complete sentences, since many of these will involve events or episodes from your subject’s life.

Class: We will share and discuss your biographical arguments, paying particular attention to your organizing claims.

Wednesday 10/24

Assignment: (1) In preparation for today’s episode of A&E Biography, you need to do some research on our biographical subject. Find three sources of information on our subject (only two of these sources can be from the internet.) Using these sources, compile a brief biographical sketch of our subject. This sketch should be 1-2 paragraphs long. Attach a bibliography of your sources to these paragraphs. Post this assignment to the class e-mail address before Tuesday evening at 7:00 PM. (2) Before class on Wednesday, everyone should read all of the paragraphs posted by your classmates.

Class: We will view an episode of A&E Biography.

Friday 10/26

Assignment: Write a 1-2 page paper in which you compare and contrast one aspect of A&E Biography to a biographical or autobiographical text that we’ve read this semester. Try to focus on something fairly specific: an aspect of style or form, a thematic concern, the use of source materials, the reliability of these sources, the position of the narrator, the treatment of events, the handling of time, etc.

Class: We will use your essays to wrap-up our discussion of A&E Biography. We will also talk about Paper #3.

 

 

Week Ten

Monday 10/29

Assignment: Paper #2 — Corrections and Revision Due

Class: We will talk about acknowledgment and response.

Wednesday 10/31

Assignment: (1) Film Choice/ Claim for Paper #3 Due (2) Bring a popular magazine into class.

Class: We will explore the use of warrants in the real world, and in our academic essays.

Friday 11/2

Assignment: Complete an argument outline in anticipation of your persuasive presentation and Paper #3.

Class: We will discuss and workshop your arguments.

 

 

Week Eleven

Monday 11/5

Assignment: Prepare your presentation and begin working on your third paper.

Class: Persuasive Presentations

Wednesday 11/7

Assignment: Prepare your presentation and begin working on your third paper.

Class: Persuasive Presentations

Friday 11/9

Assignment: Prepare your presentation and begin working on your third paper.

Class: Persuasive Presentations

 

 

Week Twelve

Monday 11/12

Assignment: Paper #3 Due

Class: We will workshop Paper #3. We will also discuss the assignment for your fourth and final essay.

*** Film Screening ***

We will gather in Clemons 201 at 5 PM Monday 11/12 to view the film that you have selected. Attendance is required. Assignment: During the film you should take notes in preparation for your final paper. Consider how this film relates to our theme and to the issues we have discussed throughout the semester. Here are some questions to keep in mind as you watch: What kind of biography is it? What is the balance of truth and invention? What sources do you think the writer, director, and cast used to produce this film? What bias can you find? What is the narrative structure of the film? How is the story told? What is the organizing claim about its biographical subject? How does it treat time? Events?

Wednesday 11/14

Assignment: (1) If your last name begins with N through Z, this assignment is for you. If your last name begins with A through M, see the assignment for Friday 11/16. This assignment is due before Tuesday evening at 7:00 PM. Post three questions on our film to the class e-mail address: ENWR110-38@toolkit.virginia.edu. (Submissions to this address are sent automatically to everyone in the class.) These should be real questions — i.e., questions you don’t have answers to but believe are important to pursue. These questions should relate to the theme and concerns of this course. See the note-taking assignment above for a list of possible question topics. For each question, write a paragraph explaining why the question is worth asking and suggesting possible ways to begin answering it. Note: E-mail submissions should observe the rules of spelling and grammar. (2) Before class on Wednesday, everyone should read all of the questions and paragraphs posted by your classmates.

Class: We will structure our discussion around the questions that you’ve posed. We will then use these questions to generate claims about the film in preparation for your last paper.

Friday 11/16

Assignment: (1) Claim for Paper #4 Due (2) If your last name begins with A through M, this assignment is for you. This assignment is due before Thursday evening at 7:00 PM. Post three questions on our film to the class e-mail address: ENWR110-38@toolkit.virginia.edu. (Submissions to this address are sent automatically to everyone in the class.) These should be real questions — i.e., questions you don’t have answers to but believe are important to pursue. These questions should relate to the theme and concerns of this course. See the note-taking assignment above for a list of possible question topics. For each question, write a paragraph explaining why the question is worth asking and suggesting possible ways to begin answering it. Note: E-mail submissions should observe the rules of spelling and grammar. (3) Before class on Wednesday, everyone should read all of the questions and paragraphs posted by your classmates.

Class: We will finish discussing the film and the questions you posed concerning it.

 

 

Week Thirteen

Monday 11/19

No Class

Wednesday 11/21 and Friday 11/23

Thanksgiving Recess

 

 

Week Fourteen

Monday 11/26

Assignment: Introduction to Paper #4 Due

Class: We will workshop your introductions.

Wednesday 11/28

Assignment: Paper #4 Due

Class: We will workshop Paper #4 and discuss your Final Portfolio.

Friday 11/30

Assignment: Using your classmates’ comments, begin revising Paper #4. This is also a good opportunity to start the revisions for your Final Portfolio.

Class: We will discuss Information Flow in your essays.

 

 

Week Fifteen

Monday 12/3

Assignment: Begin to revise your portfolios.

Class: We will discuss Topic Strings.

Wednesday 12/5

Assignment: Continue revising your portfolios. Write down at least one question or problem raised in your revision process to bring into class.

Class: We will discuss Topic Stress. We will also workshop your questions/ problems and your portfolios.

Friday 12/7

Assignment: Final Portfolio Due

Class: Final Review and Comments

 

 

 

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