Professor Setear's 1999-2000 Home Page
Home ] How We Get Into Wars ] [ Choosing Courses in International Law ] Global Warming ] Environmental Drafting and Negotiation ] War Crimes ] International Law ]

 

 

As I mentioned in the Web pages that described international-law courses available this spring, I consider International Law and International Business Transactions to be the two foundational courses in the international legal curriculum.  In the fall of 1999, both courses will be offered, with International Law taught by Professor Moore and International Business Transactions taught by Professor Stephan.  In the spring of 2000, International Law will be offered (taught by me), but International Business Transactions will not be offered.

So if you're a first-year student who took International Law this spring, and you're interested generally in international legal studies, then I strongly recommend that you take International Business Transactions this fall. If you're a first-year student who did not take International Law this spring but are strongly interested in international legal studies, then you could take both International Law and International Business Transactions in the fall, or you could take International Business Transactions in the fall and International Law in the spring.  Any of these various plans of study would mean that, by the end of your second year of law school, you will have taken both the foundational private-law and the foundational public-law courses in international law.

If you're strongly interested in private international law, then you should think about taking in your second year either Federal Income Tax I (since International Taxation has this as a prerequisite) and/or Sales (since International Taxation has this as a prerequisite).

Notice, by the way, that there aren't really that many international-law courses that actually have prerequisites.  Of the many courses offered by Professor Moore, for example, none has a prerequisite.  (He does recommend that you take International Law or National Security Law before taking his "The Indochina War" seminar, but that is a recommendation rather than a prerequisite, and his other courses have neither recommended nor prerequisite courses.)  My "How We Get Into Wars" seminar has International Law or National Security Law as a prerequisite, but my "Global Warming" seminar has no prerequisite.  The various courses on the European Union that the Law School has offered in recent years have not had prerequisites.  So, generally speaking, you have a lot of flexibility in choosing international-law courses, but the prudent student should take a look at the courses that interest him or her to see if they have a prerequisite and thus imply some advance planning.