77th CONGRESS                   SENATE                          DOCUMENT 
 1st Session                                                      No. 148  

DECLARATIONS OF A STATE OF WAR 
WITH JAPAN, GERMANY, AND ITALY

ADDRESS
OF THE
PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES

DELIVERED BEFORE A JOINT SESSION OF THE TWO
HOUSES OF THE CONGRESS ON DECEMBER 8, 1941

REQUESTING THAT

THE CONGRESS DECLARE THAT A STATE OF WAR HAS
EXISTED SINCE DECEMBER 7, 1941, BETWEEN THE
UNITED STATES AND THE JAPANESE EMPIRE

ALSO

MESSAGES FROM THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES
DATED DECEMBER 11, 1941, REQUESTING THE CONGRESS
TO RECOGNIZE A STATE OF WAR BETWEEN THE
UNITED STATES AND GERMANY, AND BETWEEN THE
UNITED STATES AND ITALY

TOGETHER WITH

THE PROCLAMATIONS OF THE PRESIDENT AND EXTRACTS
FROM THE CONGRESSIONAL RECORD SHOWING ONLY
THE OFFICIAL ACTION OF THE SENATE AND
HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES IN CON-
NECTION THEREWITH

UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
WASHINGTON: 1941

Index

Proceedings in the House of Representatives
            [Joint Session of Congress, Dec. 8, 1941] ..................................... 3
Proceedings in the Senate
            [Message from the House, Joint meeting of the Two Houses] ......... 5
Joint Session of Congress
            [ Joint Meeting of the House and Senate]
            [Address by the President of the United States] ............................. 7
Proceedings in the Senate
            [Declaration of State of War with Japan, Dec. 8, 1941] ................ 11
            [Message from the President, Dec. 11, 1941] ............................... 12
            [Declaration of State of War with Germany, Dec. 11, 1941] ......... 12
            [Declaration of State of War with Italy, Dec. 11, 1941] ................ 14
            [Resolution of the Republican Conference] ................................... 15
Proceedings in the House of Representatives
            [The President's Message] ........................................................... 17
            [War Resolution] ......................................................................... 17
            [General Extension of Remarks] ................................................... 18
            [Declaration of War] .................................................................... 19
            [Declaration of War by Germany
            and Italy Against the United States] .............................................. 20
            [Declaration of War Against Germany] ......................................... 20
            [Message from the Senate] ........................................................... 21
            [Declaration of War Against Germany] ......................................... 21
            [Declaration of War Against Italy] ................................................ 22
Radio Address President of the United States Broadcast from the White
            House On Tuesday, December 9, 1941 ....................................... 23
War with Japan [Alien Enemies-Japanese] ............................................... 31
War with Japan [Alien Enemies-German] ................................................. 37
War with Japan [Alien Enemies-Italian] .................................................... 41
Public Law No. 338
            [Remove territorial restrictions on use
            of units and members of the Army... etc.] ..................................... 45

Page 2

[SUBMITTED BY MR. BARKLEY]
IN THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES.
December 15, 1941.

Ordered, That there be printed as a Senate document the messages to Congress, the radio address, and the proclamations issued by the President of the United States, all relating to the declarations of a state of war with Japan, Germany, and Italy, together with certain proceedings in the Senate and House of Representatives in connection therewith.

Attest:
Edwin A. Halsey
Secretary

Page 3

DECLARATIONS OF A STATE OF WAR WITH JAPAN, GERMANY, AND ITALY
PROCEEDINGS IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
MONDAY, DECEMBER 8, 1941

The House met at 12 o'clock noon.

JOINT SESSION OF THE TWO HOUSES

Mr. MCCORMACK. Mr. Speaker, I offer a resolution (H. Con. Res. 1), and ask for its immediate consideration.

The Clerk read as follows:

"Resolved by the House of Representatives (the Senate concurring), That the two Houses of Congress assemble in the Hall of the House of Representatives on Monday, the 8th day of December 1941, at 12:30 o'clock p. m., for the purpose of receiving such communications as the President of the United States shall be pleased to make to them."

The concurrent resolution was agreed to.

RECESS

The SPEAKER. The House will stand in recess, subject to the call of the Chair.

Accordingly (at 12 o'clock and 3 minutes p. m.) the House stood in recess, subject to the call of the Speaker.

AFTER THE RECESS

The recess having expired, the House was called to order at 12 o'clock and 15 minutes p. m. by the Speaker.

MESSAGE FROM THE SENATE

A message from the Senate, by Mr. Frazier, its legislative clerk, announced that the Senate had agreed, without amendment, to a concurrent resolution of the House of the following title:

"H. Con. Res. 61. Concurrent resolution providing for a joint session on Monday, December 8, 1941, for the purpose of receiving such communications as the President of the United States shall be pleased to make."

Page 4
(blank)

Page 5

PROCEEDINGS IN THE SENATE
MONDAY, DECEMBER 8, 1941

The Senate met at 12 o'clock noon.

MESSAGE FROM THE HOUSE

A message from the House of Representatives, by Mr. Swanson, one of its clerks, announced that the House had agreed to House Concurrent Resolution 61, providing for a joint session of the two Houses of Congress on Monday, December 8, 1941, for the purpose of receiving such communications as the President of the United States shall be pleased to make, in which it requested the concurrence of the Senate, as follows:

"Resolved by the House of Representatives (the Senate concurring), that the two Houses of Congress assemble in the Hall of the House of Representatives on Monday, the 8th day of December 1941, at 12:30 o'clock in the afternoon, for the purpose of receiving such communications as the President of the United States shall be pleased to make to them."

CALL OF THE ROLL

Mr. HILL. I suggest the absence of a quorum.
The VICE PRESIDENT. The clerk will call the roll.
The Chief Clerk called the roll.

The VICE PRESIDENT. Eighty-two Senators have answered to their names. A quorum is present.

JOINT MEETING OF THE TWO HOUSES

Mr. BARKLEY. Mr. President, I ask that the concurrent resolution just received from the House of Representatives be laid before the Senate.

The VICE PRESIDENT laid before the Senate the concurrent resolution (H. Con. Res. 61), providing for a joint session of the two Houses of Congress on Monday, December 8,1941, for the purpose of receiving such communications as the President of the United States shall be pleased to make, which was read as follows:

"Resolved by the House of Representatives (the Senate concurring), that the two Houses of Congress assemble in the Hall of the House of Representatives on Monday, the 8th day of December 1941, at 12:30 o'clock in the afternoon,

Page 6

for the purpose of receiving such communications as the President of the United States shall be pleased to make to them."

Mr. BARKLEY. I move that the Senate concur in the resolution.

The VICE PRESIDENT. Without objection, the resolution is concurred in unanimously.

Mr. BARKLEY. I now move that the Senate proceed to the Hall of the House of Representatives, in compliance with the concurrent resolution just adopted.

The motion was agreed to; and (at 12 o'clock and 10 minutes p. m.) the Senate, escorted by the Secretary, Edwin A. Halsey, and Sergeant at Arms, Chesley W. Jurney, and preceded by the Vice President and the President pro tempore, proceeded to the Hall of the House of Representatives.

Page 7

JOINT SESSION OF THE CONGRESS
MONDAY, DECEMBER 8, 1941

JOINT MEETING OF THE HOUSE AND SENATE

The Doorkeeper, Mr. Joseph J. Sinnott, announced the Vice President of the United States and the Members of the United States Senate.

The Senate, escorted by the Secretary, Edwin A. Halsey, and the Sergeant at Arms, Chesley W. Jurney, and preceded by the Vice President and the President pro tempore, entered the Chamber.

The Vice President took the chair at the right of the Speaker, and the Members of the Senate took the seats reserved for them.

The Doorkeeper also announced the Chief Justice of the United States and the Associate Justices of the Supreme Court.

The SPEAKER. On behalf of the House the Chair appoints the following committee to conduct the President into the Chamber: Messrs. McCormack, Doughton, and Martin of Massachusetts.

The VICE PRESIDENT. The Chair appoints as members on the part of the Senate to conduct the President into the Chamber, the following members of the Senate: The Senator from Virginia [Mr. Glass], the Senator from Kentucky [Mr. Barkley], and the Senator from Oregon [Mr. McNary].

The Doorkeeper announced the members of the Cabinet of the United States.

At 12 o'clock and 29 minutes p. m., the President of the United States, escorted by the committee of Senators and Representatives, entered the Hall of the House and stood at the Clerk's desk.

The SPEAKER. Senators and Representatives of the Seventy-seventh Congress, I have the distinguished honor of presenting the President of the United States.

ADDRESS BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES

The address delivered by the President of the United States to the joint meeting of the two Houses of Congress held this day is as follows:

To the Congress of the United States:

Yesterday, December 7, 1941 a date which will live in infamy the United States of America was suddenly and deliberately attacked by naval and air forces of the Empire of Japan.

Page 8

The United States was at peace with that nation and, at the solicitation of Japan, was still in conversation with its Government and its Emperor looking toward the maintenance of peace in the Pacific. Indeed, 1 hour after Japanese air squadrons had commenced bombing in Oahu, the Japanese Ambassador to tie United States and his colleague delivered to the Secretary of State a formal reply to a recent American message. While this reply stated that it seemed useless to continue the existing diplomatic negotiations, it contained no threat or hint of war or armed attack.

It will be recorded that the distance of Hawaii from Japan makes it obvious that the attack was deliberately planned many days or even weeks ago. During the intervening time the Japanese Government has deliberately sought to deceive the United States by false statements and expressions of hope for continued peace.

The attack yesterday on the Hawaiian Islands has caused severe damage to American naval and military forces. Very many American lives have been lost. In addition American ships have been reported torpedoed on the high seas between San Francisco and Honolulu.

Yesterday the Japanese Government also launched an attack against Malaya.

Last night Japanese forces attacked Hong Kong.

Last night Japanese forces attacked Guam.

Last night Japanese forces attacked the Philippine Islands.

Last night the Japanese attacked Wake Island.

This morning the Japanese attacked Midway Island.

Japan has, therefore, undertaken a surprise offensive extending throughout the Pacific area. The facts of yesterday speak for themselves. The people of the United States have already formed their opinions and well understand the implications to the very life and safety of our Nation.

As Commander in Chief of the Army and Navy I have directed that all measures be taken for our defense.

Always will we remember the character of the onslaught against us.

No matter how long it may take us to overcome this premeditated invasion, the American people, in their righteous might, will win through to absolute victory.

I believe I interpret the will of the Congress and of the people when I assert that we will not only defend ourselves to the uttermost but will make very certain that this form of treachery shall never endanger us again.

Hostilities exist. There is no blinking at the fact that our people, our territory, and our interests are in grave danger.

Page 9

With confidence in our armed forces with the unbounded determination of our people we will gain the inevitable triumph so help us God.

I ask that the Congress declare that since the unprovoked and dastardly attack by Japan on Sunday, December 7, a state of war has existed between the United States and the Japanese Empire.

FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT.

THE WHITE HOUSE, December 8, 1941.

Thereupon (at 12 o'clock and 39 minutes p. m.) the President of the United States retired from the Hall of the House.

The Speaker announced that the joint session was dissolved.

Thereupon the Vice President and the Members of the Senate, the members of the Cabinet, and the Chief Justice and the Associate Justices of the Supreme Court retired from the Chamber.

Page 10
(blank)

Page 11

PROCEEDINGS IN THE SENATE
MONDAY, DECEMBER 8, 1941

DECLARATION OF STATE OF WAR WITH JAPAN

The Senate having returned to its chamber (at 12 o'clock and 47 minutes p. m.), it reassembled and the Vice President resumed the chair.

Mr. BARKLEY. I suggest the absence of a quorum.

The VICE PRESIDENT. The clerk will call the roll.

The legislative clerk called the roll.

* * * * * *

The VICE PRESIDENT. Eighty-two Senators have answered to their names. A quorum is present.

Mr. CONNALLY. Mr. President, I introduce a joint resolution, and ask for its immediate consideration without reference to a committee.

The VICE PRESIDENT. The joint resolution will be read.

The joint resolution (S. J. Res. 116) declaring that a state of war exists between the Imperial Government of Japan and the Government and the people of the United States, and making provision to prosecute the same, was read the first time by its title, and the second time at length, as follows:

"Whereas the Imperial Government of Japan has committed unprovoked acts of war against the Government and the people of the United states of America:

"Therefore be it

"Resolved, etc., That the state of war between the United states and the Imperial Government of Japan which has thus been thrust upon the United States is hereby formally declared; and the President is hereby authorized and directed to employ the entire naval and military forces of the United States and the resources of the Government to carry on war against the Imperial Government of Japan; and to bring the conflict to a successful termination, all of the resources of the country are hereby pledged by the Congress of the United states."

* * * * * *

After debate.

The VICE PRESIDENT. The joint resolution having been read three times the question is, Shall it pass?

On that question the yeas and nays have been demanded and ordered. The clerk will call the roll.

The Chief Clerk proceeded to call the roll.

* * * * * *

The result was announced: Yeas 82, nays, 0.

So the joint resolution was passed.

Page 12

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 11, 1941

The Senate met at 12 o'clock noon.

* * * * * *

MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT

The VICE PRESIDENT. The Chair lays before the Senate a message from the President of the United States, which the clerk will read.

The Chief Clerk read as follows:

"To the Congress of the United States:

"On the morning of December 11 the Government of Germany, pursuing its course of world conquest, declared war against the United States.

"The long known and the long expected has thus taken place. The forces endeavoring to enslave the entire world now are moving toward this hemisphere.

"Never before has there been a greater challenge to life, liberty, and civilization.

"Delay invites greater danger. Rapid and united effort by all the peoples of the world who are determined to remain free will insure a world victory of the forces of justice and of righteousness over the forces of savagery and of barbarism.

"Italy also has declared war against the United States.

"I therefore request the Congress to recognize a state of war between the United States and Germany and between the United States and Italy.

"FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT.

"THE WHITE HOUSE,

"December 11, 1941."

The VICE PRESIDENT. The message will be printed and referred to the Committee on Foreign Relations.

DECLARATION OF STATE OF WAR WITH GERMANY

Mr. Connally, from the Committee on Foreign Relations, reported an original joint resolution (S. J. Res. 119) declaring that a state of war exists between the Government of Germany and the Government and the people of the United States, and making provision to prosecute the same, which was read the first time by its title, and the second time at length, as follows:

"Whereas the Government of Germany has formally declared war against the Government and the people of the United States of America: Therefore be it

"Resolved, etc., That the state of war between the United States and the Government of Germany, which has thus been thrust upon the United states, is hereby formally declared; and the President is hereby authorized and directed

Page 13

to employ the entire naval and military forces of the United States and the resources of the Government to carry on war against the Government of Germany; and, to bring the conflict to a successful termination, all of the resources of the country are hereby pledged by the Congress of the United States."

Mr. CONNALLY. Mr. President, I shall presently ask unanimous consent for the immediate consideration of the joint resolution just read to the Senate. Before the request is submitted, however, I desire to say that, being advised of the declaration of war upon the United States by the Governments of Germany and Italy, and anticipating a message by the President of the United States in relation thereto, and after a conference with the Secretary of State, as chairman of the Committee on Foreign Relations, I called a meeting of the committee this morning and submitted to the committee the course I expected to pursue as chairman and the request which I expected to make.

I am authorized by the Committee on Foreign Relations to say to the Senate that after consideration of the text of the joint resolution which I have reported and after mature consideration of all aspects of this matter, the membership of the Committee on Foreign Relations unanimously approve and agree to the course suggested. One member of the committee was absent, but I have authority to express his views.

Mr. President, I ask unanimous consent for the present consideration of the joint resolution.

The VICE PRESIDENT. Is there objection?

There being no objection, the Senate proceeded to consider the joint resolution (S. J. Res. 119) declaring that a state of war exists between the Government of Germany and the Government and the people of the United States, and making provision to prosecute the same.

The VICE PRESIDENT. The question is on the engrossment and third reading of the joint resolution.

The joint resolution was ordered to be engrossed for a third reading, and was read the third time.

The VICE PRESIDENT. The joint resolution having been read the third time, the question is, Shall it pass?

Mr. CONNALLY. On that question I ask for the yeas and nays.

The yeas and nays were ordered, and the Chief Clerk proceeded to call the roll.

The result was announced yeas 88, nays 0.

* * * * * *

So the joint resolution (S. J. Res. 119) was passed.

The preamble was agreed to.

Page 14

DECLARATION OF STATE OF WAR WITH ITALY

Mr. Connally, from the Committee on Foreign Relations, reported an original joint resolution (S. J. Res. 120) declaring; that a state of war exists between the Government of Italy and the Government and the people of the United States and making provision to prosecute the same, which was read the first time by its title and the second time at length, as follows:

"Whereas the Government of Italy has formally declared war against the Government and the people of the United States of America: Therefore be it

"Resolved, etc., That the state of war between the United States and the Government of Italy which has thus been thrust upon the United States is hereby formally declared; and the President is hereby authorized and directed to employ the entire naval and military forces of the United States and the resources of the Government to carry on war against the Government of Italy; and, to bring the conflict to a successful termination, all of the resources of the country are hereby pledged by the Congress of the United States."

Mr. CONNALLY. Mr. President, with the same statement which I made earlier with regard to the Senate Joint Resolution 119 which has just been passed, I ask unanimous consent for the present consideration of Senate Joint Resolution 120.

The VICE PRESIDENT. Is there objection to the present consideration of the joint resolution?

There being no objection, the Senate proceeded to consider the joint resolution (S. J. Res. 120) declaring that a state of war exists between the Government of Italy and the Government and the people of the United States and making provision to prosecute the same.

The VICE PRESIDENT. The question is on the engrossment and third reading of the joint resolution.

The joint resolution was ordered to be engrossed for a third reading, and was read the third time.

The VICE PRESIDENT. The joint resolution having been read the third time, the question is, Shall it pass?

Mr. CONNALLY. Mr. President, on the passage of the joint resolution, I ask for the yeas and nays.

The yeas and nays were ordered.

The legislative clerk proceeded to call the roll.

* * * * * *

The result was announced yeas 90, nays 0.

* * * * * *

So the joint resolution (S. J. Res. 120) was passed.

Page 15

RESOLUTION OF THE REPUBLICAN CONFERENCE

Mr. MCNARY. Mr. President, yesterday I issued a call for a Republican conference. The conference was had this morning and a resolution was unanimously adopted, which I ask unanimous consent that the clerk may read.

The VICE PRESIDENT. Without objection, the resolution will be read.

The Chief Clerk read as follows:

"Resolved, That the Republican conference pledge to the President of the United States its unanimous support in the vigorous and efficient prosecution of the war."

Mr. BARKLEY. Mr. President, on my own behalf and on behalf of the majority, and I am sure on behalf of the country, I wish to assure the Senator from Oregon, as minority leader, of our deep appreciation, not only of their resolution just presented by him but of his cooperation and that of his Republican colleagues in the prosecution of this war which has been thrust upon the United States.

Page 16
(blank)

Page 17
 

PROCEEDINGS IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

MONDAY, DECEMBER 8, 1941

The joint Session of the Senate and the House having been dissolved, the House was called to order by the Speaker at 12 o'clock and 46 minutes p. m.

THE PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE

Mr. MCCORMACK. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that the message of the President of the United states be referred to the committee on Foreign Affairs and ordered to be printed.

The SPEAKER. Without objection it is so ordered.

There was no objection.

* * * * * *

WAR RESOLUTION

Mr. MCCORMACK. Mr. Speaker, I move to suspend the rules and pass House Joint Resolution 254, which I send to the desk.

The SPEAKER. The Clerk will read the joint resolution.

The Clerk read as follows:

"Declaring that a state of war exists between the Imperial Government of Japan and the Government and the people of the United States and making provisions to prosecute the same.

"Whereas the Imperial Government of Japan has committed repeated acts of war against the Government and the people of the United States of America:

"Therefore be it

"Resolved, etc., That the state of war between the United States and the Imperial Government of Japan which has thus been thrust upon the United States is hereby formally declared; and that the President be, and he is hereby, authorized and directed to employ the entire naval and military forces of the United States and the resources of the Government to carry on war against the Imperial Government of Japan; and to bring the conflict to a successful termination all of the resources of the country are hereby pledged by the Congress of the United States."

The SPEAKER. Is a second demanded?

Mr. MARTIN of Massachusetts. Mr. Speaker, I demand a second.

The SPEAKER. Without objection, a second is considered as ordered.

There was no objection.

Page 18

The SPEAKER. The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Massachusetts [Mr. McCormack].

Mr. MCCORMACK. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself 20 seconds.

Mr. Speaker and my fellow Americans, the President of the United States has just spoken to the Congress and to the American people. A dastardly attack has been made upon us. This is the time for action.

After debate.

* * * * * *

Mr. MCCORMACK. Mr. Speaker, I ask for a vote, and on that I demand the yeas and nays.

The SPEAKER. The gentleman from Massachusetts demands the yeas and nays. Those who favor taking this vote by the yeas and nays will rise and remain standing until counted.

The SPEAKER. The yeas and nays were ordered. The question is, Will the House suspend the rules and pass the resolution?

The question was taken; and there were yeas 388, nays 1.

* * * * * *

So (two-thirds having voted in favor thereof) the rules were suspended, and the joint resolution was passed.

The SPEAKER. The Chair desires to announce that he has held in the past and will hold henceforth that it is contrary to the rules of the House for any Member to announce how an absent Member would vote if present.

The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.

A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.

* * * * * *

GENERAL EXTENSION OF REMARKS

Mr. MCCORMACK. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that all Members may be permitted to extend their own remarks on the resolution just acted upon immediately prior to the roll call.

The SPEAKER. Is there objection to the request of the gentleman from Massachusetts [Mr. McCormack]?

Mr. TERRY. Mr. Speaker, reserving the right to object, will that permit one to include in his remarks a telegram from a colleague showing how he would have voted ?

The SPEAKER. His own remarks only. Is there objection to the request of the gentleman from Massachusetts [Mr. McCormack]?

There was no objection.

Mr. MCCORMACK. Mr. Speaker, a number of Members are unavoidably absent and on their way here. I ask unanimous consent that all

Page 19

Members may have 5 legislative days in which to extend their own remarks on the resolution just adopted.

The SPEAKER. Is there objection to the request of the gentleman from Massachusetts [Mr. McCormack]?

There was no objection.

DECLARATION OF WAR

Mr. MCCORMACK. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent to take from the Speaker's table the Senate joint resolution (S. J. Res. 116) declaring that a state of war exists between the Imperial Government of Japan and the Government and the people of the United States, and making provision to prosecute the same, and agree to the same.

The Clerk read the Senate joint resolution, as follows:

"Whereas the Imperial Government of Japan has committed repeated acts of war against the Government and the people of the United States of America:

"Therefore be it

"Resolved, etc., That the state of war between the United States and the Imperial Government of Japan which has thus been thrust upon the United States is hereby formally declared; and that the President be, and he is hereby, authorized and directed to employ the entire naval and military forces of the United States and the resources of the Government to carry on war against the Imperial Government of Japan; and, to bring the conflict to a successful termination, all of the resources of the country are hereby pledged by the Congress of the United States."

The SPEAKER. Is there objection to the request of the gentleman from Massachusetts [Mr. McCormack]?

Mr. MARTIN of Massachusetts. Mr. Speaker, reserving the right to object and, of course, I am not going to object this is the same declaration that we just passed?

The SPEAKER. The same.

Mr. MCCORMACK. Yes.

The SPEAKER. Is there objection to the request of the gentleman from Massachusetts [Mr. McCormack]?

There was no objection.

The Senate joint resolution was ordered to be read a third time, was read the third time, and passed, and a motion to reconsider was laid on the table.

Mr. MCCORMACK. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that the proceedings by which the House passed House Joint Resolution 254 be vacated and that the resolution be laid on the table.

The SPEAKER. Is there objection to the request of the gentleman from Massachusetts [Mr. McCormack]?

There was no objection.

Page 20

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 11, 1941

DECLARATION OF WAR BY GERMANY AND ITALY AGAINST THE UNITED STATES

The Speaker laid before the House the following message from the President of the United States, which was read:

"To the Congress of the United States:

"On the morning of December 11, the Government of Germany, pursuing its course of world conquest, declared war against the United States.

"The long known and the long expected has thus taken place. The forces endeavoring to enslave the entire world now are moving toward this hemisphere.

"Never before has there been a greater challenge to life, liberty, and civilization.

"Delay invites greater danger. Rapid and united effort by all of the peoples of the world who are determined to remain free will insure a world victory of the forces of justice and of righteousness over the forces of savagery and of barbarism.

"Italy also has declared war against the United States.

"I, therefore, request the Congress to recognize a state of war between the United States and Germany, and between the United States and Italy.

"FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT.

"THE WHITE HOUSE,

"December 11, 1941."

Mr. MCCORMACK. Mr. Speaker, I move that the message of the President be referred to the Committee on Foreign Affairs, and ordered printed.

The motion was agreed to.

DECLARATION OF WAR AGAINST GERMANY

Mr. MCCORMACK. Mr. Speaker, I move to suspend the rules and pass House Joint Resolution 256, which I send to the desk and ask to have read.

The Clerk read as follows.

"Whereas the Government of Germany has formally declared war against the Government and the people of the United States of America: Therefore be it

"Resolved, etc., That the state of war between the United States and the Government of Germany which has thus been thrust upon the United States is hereby formally declared; and the President is hereby authorized and directed to employ the entire naval and military forces of the United States and the resources of the Government to carry on war against the Government

Page 21

of Germany; and, to bring the conflict to a successful termination, all of the resources of the country are hereby pledged by the Congress of the United States."

The SPEAKER. The question is, Will the House suspend the rules and pass the joint resolution?

Mr. MCCORMACK. Mr. Speaker, on that I demand the yeas and nays.

The yeas and nays were ordered.

* * * * * *

The question was taken; and there were yeas 393, answered "present" 1, not voting 36.

So (two-thirds having voted in favor thereof) the rules were suspended, and the resolution was agreed to.

A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.

MESSAGE FROM THE SENATE

A message from the Senate, by Mr. Frazier, its legislative clerk, announced that the Senate had passed joint resolutions of the following titles, in which the concurrence of the House is requested:

"S. J. Res. 119. Joint resolution declaring that a state of war exists between the Government of Germany and the Government and the people of the United States and making provision to prosecute the same; and

"S. J. Res. 120. Joint resolution declaring that a state of war exists between the Government of Italy and the Government and the people of the United States and making provision to prosecute the same."

DECLARATION OF WAR AGAINST GERMANY

Mr. MCCORMACK. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent to take from the Speaker's table Senate Joint Resolution 119, which is identical with the resolution just adopted by the House, and pass the Senate resolution.

The Clerk read the title of the resolution.

The SPEAKER. Is there objection to the request of the gentleman from Massachusetts?

There was no objection.

The Senate joint resolution was read a third time, and passed.

A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.

Mr. MCCORMACK. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that the action just taken by the House in the passage of House Joint Resolution 256 be vacated and that the resolution be laid on the table.

The SPEAKER. Without objection, it is so ordered.

There was no objection.

Page 22

DECLARATION OF WAR AGAINST ITALY

Mr. MCCORMACK. Mr. Speaker, I move to suspend the rule and pass Senate Joint Resolution 120, which I have sent to the Clerk's desk.

The Clerk read as follows:

"Whereas the Government of Italy has formally declared war against the Government and the people of the United States of America: Therefore be it

"Resolved, etc., That the state of war between the United States and the Government of Italy, which has thus been thrust upon the United States, is hereby formally declared; and the President is hereby authorized and directed to employ the entire naval and military forces of the United States and the resources of the Government to carry on war against the Government of Italy; and, to bring the conflict to a successful termination, all of the resources of the country are hereby pledged by the Congress of the United States."

The SPEAKER. The question is, Will the House suspend the rules and pass the resolution?

Mr. MCCORMACK. Mr. Speaker, on this vote I ask for the yeas and nays.

The yeas and nays were ordered.

The question was taken; and there were yeas 399, answered "present" 1, not voting 30, as follows:

* * * * * *

So, two-thirds having voted in favor thereof, the rules were suspended and the resolution was agreed to. A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.

Page 23

RADIO ADDRESS BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED
STATES BROADCAST FROM THE WHITE HOUSE, ON
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 9, 1941

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1941

WAR WITH JAPAN

Mr. BARKLEY. Mr. President, I ask unanimous consent to have printed in the Record the address delivered last evening by the President of the United States over a Nation-wide radio hook-up.

There being no objection, the address was ordered to be printed in the Record, as follows:

Fellow Citizens: The sudden criminal attacks perpetrated by the Japanese in the Pacific provide the climax of a decade of international immorality.

Powerful and resourceful gangsters have banded together to make war upon the whole human race. Their challenge has now been flung at the United States of America. The Japanese have treacherously violated the long- standing peace between us. Many American soldiers and sailors have been killed by enemy action. American ships have been sunk, American airplanes have been destroyed.

The Congress and the people of the United States have accepted that challenge.

Together with other free peoples, we are now fighting to maintain our right to live among our world neighbors in freedom and in common decency, without fear of assault.

I have prepared the full record of our past relations with Japan, and it will be submitted to the Congress. It begins with the visit of Commodore Perry to Japan 88 years ago. It ends with the visit of two Japanese emissaries to the Secretary of State last Sunday, an hour after Japanese forces had loosed their bombs and machine guns against our flag, our forces, and our citizens.

I can say with utmost confidence that no Americans today or a thousand years hence, need feel anything but pride in our patience and our efforts through all the years toward achieving a peace in the Pacific which would be fair and honorable to every nation, large or small. And no honest person, today or a thousand years hence, will be able to suppress a sense of indignation and horror at the treachery committed by the military dictators of Japan under the very shadow of the flag of peace borne by their special envoys in our midst.

Page 24

The course that Japan has followed for the past 10 years in Asia has paralleled the course of Hitler and Mussolini in Europe and Africa. Today, it has become far more than a parallel. It is collaboration so well calculated that all the continents of the world, and all the oceans, are now considered by the Axis strategists as one gigantic battlefield.

In 1931, Japan invaded Manchukuo without warning.

In 1935, Italy invaded Ethiopia without warning.

In 1938, Hitler occupied Austria without warning.

In 1939, Hitler invaded Czechoslovakia without warning.

Later in 1939, Hitler invaded Poland without warning.

In 1940, Hitler invaded Norway, Denmark, Holland, Belgium, and Luxembourg without warning.

In 1940, Italy attacked France and later Greece without warning.

In 1941, the Axis Powers attacked Jugoslavia and Greece and they dominated the Balkans without warning.

In 1941, Hitler invaded Russia without warning.

And now Japan has attacked Malaya and Thailand and the United States without warning.

It is all of one pattern.

We are now in this war. We are all in it all the way. Every single man, woman, and child is a partner in the most tremendous undertaking of our American history. We must share together the bad news and the good news, the defeats and the victories the changing fortunes of war.

So far, the news has all been bad. We have suffered a serious set-back in Hawaii. Our forces in the Philippines, which include the brave people of that commonwealth, are taking punishment, but are defending themselves vigorously. The reports from Guam and Wake and Midway Islands are still confused, but we must be prepared for the announcement that all these three outposts have been seized.

The casualty lists of these first few days will undoubtedly be large. I deeply feel the anxiety of all families of the men in our armed forces and the relatives of people in cities which have been bombed. I can only give them my solemn promise that they will get news just as quickly as possible.

This Government will put its trust in the stamina of the American people, and will give the facts to the public as soon as two conditions have been fulfilled: First, that the information has been definitely and officially confirmed; and, second, that the release of the information at the time it is received will not prove valuable to the enemy, directly or indirectly.

Most earnestly I urge my countrymen to reject all rumors. These ugly little hints of complete disaster fly thick and fast in wartime. They have to be examined and appraised.

Page 25

As an example, I can tell you frankly that until further surveys are made, I have not sufficient information to state the exact damage which has been done to our naval vessels at Pearl Harbor. Admittedly the damage is serious. But no one can say how serious, until we know how much of this damage can be repaired and how quickly the necessary repairs can be made.

I cite as another example a statement made on Sunday night that a Japanese carrier had been located and sunk of the Canal Zone. And when you hear statements that are attributed to what they call "an authoritative source," you can be reasonably sure that under these war circumstances the "authoritative source" was not any person in authority.

Many rumors and reports which we now hear originate with enemy sources. For instance, today the Japanese are claiming that as a result of their one action against Hawaii they have gained naval supremacy in the Pacific. This is an old trick of propaganda which has been used innumerable times by the Nazis. The purposes of such fantastic claims are, of course, to spread fear and confusion among us, and to goad us into revealing military information which our enemies are desperately anxious to obtain.

Our Government will not be caught in this obvious trap and neither will our people.

It must be remembered by each and every one of us that our free and rapid communication must be greatly restricted in wartime. It is not possible to receive full, speedy, accurate reports from distant areas of combat. This is particularly true where naval operations are concerned. For in these days of the marvels of radio it is often impossible for the commanders of various units to report their activities by radio, for the very simple reason that this information would become available to the enemy, and would disclose their position and their plan of defense or attack.

Of necessity there will be delays in officially confirming or denying reports of operations but we will not hide facts from the country if we know the facts and if the enemy will not be aided by their disclosure.

To all newspapers and radio stations all those who reach the eyes and ears of the American people I say this: You have a most grave responsibility to the Nation now and for the duration of this war.

If you feel that your Government is not disclosing enough of the truth, you have every right to say so. But in the absence of all the facts, as revealed by official sources you have no right to deal out unconfirmed reports in such a way as to make people believe they are gospel truth.

Every citizen, in every walk of life, shares this same responsibility.

Page 26

The lives of our soldiers and sailors-the whole future of this Nation- depend upon the manner in which each and every one of us fulfills his obligation to our country.

Now a word about the recent past and the future. A year and a half has elapsed since the fall of France, when the whole world first realized the mechanized might which the Axis nations had been building for so many years. America has used that year and a half to great advantage. Knowing that the attack might reach us in all too short a time, we immediately began greatly to increase our industrial strength and our capacity to meet the demands of modern warfare.

Precious months were gained by sending vast quantities of our war materials to the nations of the world still able to resist Axis aggression. Our policy rested on the fundamental truth that the defense of any country resisting Hitler or Japan was in the long run the defense of our own country. That policy has been justified. It has given us time, invaluable time, to build our American assembly lines of production.

Assembly lines are now in operation. Others are being rushed to completion. A steady stream of tanks and planes, of guns and ships, of shells and equipment that is what these 18 months have given us.

But it is all only a beginning of what has to be done. We must be set to face a long war against crafty and powerful bandits. The attack at Pearl Harbor can be repeated at any one of many points in both oceans and along both our coast lines and against all the rest of the hemisphere.

It will not only be a long war, it will be a hard war. That is the basis on which we now lay all our plans. That is the yardstick by which we measure what we shall need and demand money, materials, doubled and quadrupled production, ever increasing. The production must be not only for our own Army and Navy and air forces. It must reinforce the other armies and navies and air forces fighting the Nazis and the war lords of Japan throughout the Americas and the world.

I have been working today on the subject of production. Your Government has decided on two broad policies.

The first is to speed up all existing production by working on a 7-day- week basis in every war industry, including the production of essential raw materials.

The second policy, now being put into form, is to rush additions to the capacity of production by building more new plants, by adding to old plants, and by using the many smaller plants for war needs.

Over the hard road of the past months we have at times met obstacles and difficulties, divisions and disputes, indifference and callousness. That is now all past and, I am sure, forgotten.

The fact is that the country now has an organization in Washington built around men and women who are recognized experts in their own

Page 27

fields. I think the country knows that the people who are actually responsible in each and every one of these many fields are pulling together with a teamwork that has never before been excelled.

On the road ahead there lies hard work grueling work day and night, every hour and every minute.

I was about to add that ahead there lies sacrifice for all of us.

But it is not correct to use that word. The United States does not consider it a sacrifice to do all one can, to give one's best to our Nation when the Nation is fighting for its existence and its future life.

It is not a sacrifice for any man, old or young, to be in the Army or the Navy of the United States. Rather is it a privilege.

It is not a sacrifice for the industrialist or the wage earner, the farmer or the shopkeeper, the trainman or the doctor, to pay more taxes, to buy more bonds, to forego extra profits, to work longer or harder at the task for which he is best fitted. Rather is it a privilege.

It is not a sacrifice to do without many things to which we are accustomed if the national defense calls for doing without.

A review this morning leads me to the conclusion that at present we shall not have to curtail the normal articles of food. There is enough food for all of us and enough left over to send to those who are fighting on the same side with us.

There will be a clear and definite shortage of metals of many kinds for civilian use, for the very good reason that in our increased program we shall need for war purposes more than half of that portion of the principal metals which during the past year have gone into articles or civilian use. We shall have to give up many things entirely.
I am sure that the people in every part of the Nation are prepared in their individual living to win this war. I am sure they will cheerfully help to pay a large part of its financial cost while it goes on. I am sure they will cheerfully give up those material things they are asked to give up.

I am sure that they will retain all those great spiritual things without which we cannot win through.

I repeat that the United States can accept no result save victory, final and complete. Not only must the shame of Japanese treachery be wiped out, but the sources of international brutality, wherever they exist, must be absolutely and finally broken.

In my message to the Congress yesterday I said that we "will make very certain that this form of treachery shall never endanger us again." In order to achieve that certainty, we must begin the great task that is before us by abandoning once and for all the illusion that we can ever again isolate ourselves from the rest of humanity.

In these past few years and, most violently. In the past few days we have learned a terrible lesson.

Page 28

It is our obligation to our dead it is our sacred obligation to their children and our children that we must never forget what we have learned.

And what we all have learned is this:

There is no such thing as security for any nation or any individual in a world ruled by the principles of gangsterism.

There is no such thing as impregnable defense against powerful aggressors who sneak up in the dark and strike without warning.

We have learned that our ocean-girt hemisphere is not immune from severe attack that we cannot measure our safety in terms of miles on any map.

We may acknowledge that our enemies have performed a brilliant feat of deception, perfectly timed and executed with great skill. It was a thoroughly dishonorable deed, but we must face the fact that modern warfare as conducted in the Nazi manner is a dirty business. We don't like it we didn't want to get in it but we are in it, and we're going to fight it with everything we've got.

I do not think any American has any doubt of our ability to administer proper punishment to the perpetrators of these crimes.

Your Government knows that for weeks Germany has been telling Japan that if Japan did not attack the United States, Japan would not share in dividing the spoils with Germany when peace came. She was promised by Germany that if she came in she would receive the complete and perpetual control of the whole of the Pacific area and that means not only the Far East, not only all of the islands in the Pacific, but also a stranglehold on the west coast of North, Central, and South America.

We also know that Germany and Japan are conducting their military and naval operations in accordance with a joint plan. That plan considers all peoples and nations which are not helping the Axis Powers as common enemies of each and every one of the Axis Powers.

That is their simple and obvious grand strategy. That is why the American people must realize that it can be matched only with similar grand strategy. We must realize, for example, that Japanese successes against the United States in the Pacific are helpful to German operations in Libya; that any German success against the Caucasus is inevitably an assistance to Japan in her operations against the Dutch East Indies; that a German attack against Algiers or Morocco opens the way to a German attack against South America.

On the other side of the picture we must learn to know that guerrilla warfare against the Germans in Serbia helps us; that a successful Russian offensive against the Germans helps us; and that British successes on land or sea in any part of the world strengthen our hands.

Page 29

Remember always that Germany and Italy, regardless of any formal declaration of war, consider themselves at war with the United States at this moment just as much as they consider themselves at war with Britain and Russia. And Germany puts all the other republics of the Americas into the category of enemies. The people of the hemisphere can be honored by that.

The true goal we seek is far above and beyond the ugly field of battle. When we resort to force, as now we must, we are determined that this force shall be directed toward ultimate good as well as against immediate evil. We Americans are not destroyers; we are builders.

We are now in the midst of a war, not for conquest, not for vengeance, but for a world in which this Nation, and all that this Nation represents, will be safe for our children. We expect to eliminate the danger from Japan, but it would serve us ill if we accomplished that and found that the rest of the world was dominated by Hitler and Mussolini.

We are going to win the war, and we are going to win the peace that follows.

And in the dark hours of this day and through dark days that may yet to come we will know that the vast majority of the members the human race are on our side. Many of them are fighting with us. All of them are praying for us. For, in representing our cause, we represent theirs as well our hope and their hope for liberty under God.

Page 30
(blank)

Page 31

WAR WITH JAPAN

[ALIEN ENEMIES-JAPANESE]

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

A PROCLAMATION

Authority

Whereas it is provided by Section 21 of Title 50 of the United States Code as follows:

"Whenever there is a declared war between the United States and any foreign nation or government, or any invasion or predatory incursion is perpetrated, attempted, or threatened against the territory of the United States by any foreign nation or government, and the President makes public proclamation of the event, all natives, citizens, denizens, or subjects of the hostile nation or government, being of the age of fourteen years and upward, who shall be within the United States and not actually naturalized, shall be liable to be apprehended, restrained, secured, and removed as alien enemies. The President is authorized in any such event, by his proclamation thereof, or other public act, to direct the conduct to be observed, on the part of the United States, toward the aliens who become so liable; the manner and degree of the restraint to which they shall be subject and in what cases, and upon what security their residence shall be permitted, and to provide for the removal of those who, not being permitted to reside within the United States, refuse or neglect to depart therefrom; and to establish any other regulations which are found necessary in the premises and for the public safety."

and

Whereas by Sections 2, 23 and 24 of Title 50 of the United States Code further provision is made relative to alien enemies:

PROCLAMATION

Now, therefore, I, Franklin D. Roosevelt, as President of the United States, and as Commander in Chief of the Army and Navy of the United States, do hereby make public proclamation to all whom it may concern that an invasion has been perpetrated upon the territory of the United States by the Empire of Japan.

Conduct to be observed by alien enemies

And, acting under and by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution of the United States and the said sections of the United States Code, I do hereby further proclaim and direct that

Page 32

the conduct to be observed on the part of the United States toward all natives, citizens, denizens or subjects of the Empire of Japan being of the age of fourteen years and upwards who shall be within the United States or within any territories in any way subject to the jurisdiction of the United States and not actually naturalized, who for the purpose of this Proclamation and under such sections of the United States Code are termed alien enemies, shall be as follows:

All alien enemies are enjoined to preserve the peace towards the United States and to refrain from crime against the public safety, and from violating the laws of the United States and of the States and Territories thereof; and to refrain from actual hostility or giving information, aid or comfort to the enemies of the United States or interfering by word or deed with the defense of the United States or the political processes and public opinions thereof; and to comply strictly with the regulations which are hereby or which may be from time to time promulgated by the President.

All alien enemies shall be liable to restraint, or to give security, or to remove and depart from the United States in the manner prescribed by Sections 23 and 24 of Title 50 of the United States Code, and as prescribed in the regulations duly promulgated by the President.

Duties and authority of the Attorney General and the Secretary of War

And, pursuant to the authority vested in me, I hereby charge the Attorney General with the duty of executing all the regulations hereinafter contained regarding the conduct of alien enemies within continental United States, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands and Alaska, and the Secretary of War with the duty of executing the regulations which are hereinafter set forth and which may be hereafter. Adopted regarding the conduct of alien enemies in the Canal Zone, the Hawaiian Islands and the Philippine Islands. Each of them is specifically directed to cause the apprehension of such alien enemies as in the judgment of each are subject to apprehension or deportation under such regulations. In carrying out such regulations within the continental United States, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands and Alaska, the Attorney General is authorized to utilize such agents, agencies, officers and Departments of the United States and of the several states, territories, dependencies and municipalities thereof and of the District of Columbia as he may select for the purpose. Similarly the Secretary of War in carrying out such regulations in the Canal Zone, the Hawaiian Islands and the Philippine Islands is authorized to use such agents, agencies, officers and departments of the United States and of the

Page 33

territories, dependencies and municipalities thereof as he may select for the purpose. All such agents, agencies, officers and departments are hereby granted full authority for all acts done by them in the execution of such regulations when acting by direction of the Attorney General or the Secretary of War, as the case may be.

REGULATIONS

And, pursuant to the authority vested in me, I hereby declare and establish the following regulations which I find necessary in the premises and for the public safety:

(1) No alien enemy shall enter or be found within the Canal Zone and no alien enemy shall enter or leave the Hawaiian Islands or the Philippine Islands except under such regulations as the Secretary of War shall from time to time prescribe. Any alien enemy found in the Canal Zone, the Hawaiian Islands, or the Philippine Islands in violation of any such regulations and any alien enemy who enters or is found within any restricted area to be hereafter prescribed by the Military Commanders of each such territory in the Canal Zone, the Hawaiian Islands, and the Philippine Islands, may be immediately apprehended by authority of the Military Governors in each such territory, or if there be no Military Governor, then by authority of the Secretary of War, and detained until it is determined, under the regulations to be prescribed by the Secretary of War, whether any such alien enemy should be permanently interned following which such alien enemy shall either be released, released on bond, or permanently interned, as the case may be.

(2) The exercise of the power to prescribe restricted areas and the power of arrest, detention and internment of alien enemies in the Canal Zone, the Hawaiian Islands or the Philippine Islands shall be under the jurisdiction of the Military Commanders of each such territory, each acting under such regulations as the Secretary of War shall hereafter prescribe.

(3) No alien enemy shall enter or leave Alaska, Puerto Rico or the Virgin Islands except under such regulations as the Attorney General shall from time to time prescribe. Any alien enemy found in Alaska, Puerto Rico or the Virgin Islands in violation of any such regulations and any alien enemy who enters or is found within any restricted area to be hereafter prescribed by the Military Commanders of each such territory in Alaska, Puerto Rico and by the Naval Commander in the Virgin Islands, shall be immediately apprehended by the authority of the Attorney General acting through the United States Attorney in each such territory and detained until it is determined, under the regulations to be prescribed by the Attorney General, whether any such

Page 34

alien enemy shall either be released, released on bond, or permanently interned, as the case may be.

(4) The Military Commanders in Alaska and Puerto Rico and the Naval Commander in the Virgin Islands shall have the power to prescribe restricted areas.

(5) No alien enemy shall have in his possession, custody or control at any time or place or use or operate any of the following enumerated articles:

a. Firearms.

b. Weapons or implements of war or component parts thereof.

c. Ammunition.

d. Bombs.

e. Explosives or material used in the manufacture of explosives.

f. Short-wave radio receiving sets.

g. Transmitting sets.

h. Signal devices.

i. Codes or ciphers.

j. Cameras.

k. Papers, documents or books in which there may be invisible writing; photograph, sketch, picture, drawing, map or graphical representation of any military or naval installations or equipment or of any arms, ammunition, implements of war, device or thing used or intended to be used in the combat equipment of the land or naval forces of the United States or of any military or naval post, camp or station.

All such property found in the possession of any alien enemy in violation of the foregoing regulations shall be subject to seizure and forfeiture.

(6) No alien enemy shall undertake any air flight or ascend into the air in any airplane, aircraft or balloon of any sort whether owned governmentally, commercially or privately, except that travel by an alien enemy in an airplane or aircraft may be authorized by the Attorney General, or his representative, or the Secretary of War, or his representative, in their respective jurisdictions, under such regulations as they shall prescribe.

(7) Alien enemies deemed dangerous to the public peace or safety of the United States by the Attorney General or the Secretary of War, as the case may be, are subject to summary apprehension. Such apprehension shall be made in the continental United States, Alaska, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands by such duly authorized officer of the Department of Justice as the Attorney General may determine. In the Canal Zone, the Hawaiian Islands and the Philippine Islands, such arrests shall be made by the Military Commanders in each such territory by authority of the respective Military Governors thereof, and

Page 35

if there be no Military Governor, then by authority of the Secretary of War. Alien enemies arrested shall be subject to confinement in such place of detention as may be directed by the officers responsible for the execution of these regulations and for the arrest, detention and internment of alien enemies in each ease, or in such other places of detention as may be directed from time to time by the Attorney General, with respect to continental United States, Alaska, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, and by the Secretary of War with respect to the Canal Zone, the Hawaiian Islands and the Philippine Islands, and there confined until he shall have received such permit as the Attorney General or the Secretary of War with respect to the Canal Zone, the Hawaiian Islands and the Philippine Islands shall prescribe.

(8) No alien enemy shall Sand in enter or leave or attempt to land in, enter or leave the United States, except under the regulations prescribed by the President in his Proclamation dated November 14, 1941 [1] and the regulations promulgated thereunder or any proclamation or regulation promulgated hereafter.

(9) Whenever the Attorney General of the United States, with respect to the continental United States, Alaska, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Is]ands, or the Secretary of War with respect to the Canal Zone, the Hawaiian Islands, and the Philippine Islands, deems it to be necessary, for the public safety and protection, to exclude alien enemies from a designated area, surrounding any fort, camp, arsenal, airport, landing field. Aircraft station, electric or other power plant, hydroelectric dam, government naval vessel, navy yard, pier, dock, dry dock, or any factory, foundry, plant, workshop, storage yard, or warehouse for the manufacture of munitions or implements of war or any thing of any kind, nature or description for the use of the Army, the Navy or any country allied or associated with the United States, or in any wise completed with the national defense of the United States, or from any locality in which residence by an alien enemy shall be found to constitute a danger to the public peace and safety of the United States or from a designated area surrounding any canal or any wharf, pier, dock or dry dock used by ships or vessels of any designated tonnage engaged in foreign or domestic trade, or of any warehouse, shed, elevator, railroad terminal, depot or yard or other terminal, storage or transfer facility, then no alien enemy shall be found within such area or the immediate vicinity thereof. Any alien enemy found within any such area or the immediate vicinity thereof prescribed by the Attorney General or the Secretary of War, as the case may be, pursuant to these regulations, shall be subject to summary apprehension and to be dealt with as hereinabove prescribed.

[1] 6 F. R. 5821.

Page 36

(10) With respect to the continental United States, Alaska, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands, an alien enemy shall not change his place of abode or occupation or otherwise travel or move from place to place without full compliance with any such regulations as the Attorney General of the United States may, from time to time, make and declare; and the Attorney General is hereby authorized to make and declare, from time to time, such regulations concerning the movements of alien enemies within the continental United States, Alaska, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, as he may deem necessary in the premises and for the public safety.

(11) With respect to the Canal Zone, the Hawaiian Islands and the Philippine Islands, an alien enemy shall not change his place of abode or occupation or otherwise travel or move from place to place without full compliance with any such regulations as the Secretary of War may, from time to time, make and declare; and the Secretary of War is hereby authorized to make and declare, from time to time, such regulations concerning the movements of alien enemies within the Canal Zone, the Hawaiian Islands, and the Philippine Islands as he may deem necessary in the premises and for the public safety.

(12) No alien enemy shall enter or be found in or upon any highway, waterway, airway, railway, railroad, subway, public utility, building, place or thing not open and accessible to the public generally, and not generally used by the public.

(13) No alien enemy shall be a member or an officer of, or affiliated with, any organization, group or assembly hereafter designated by the Attorney General, nor shall any alien enemy advocate, defend or subscribe to the acts, principles or policies thereof, attend any meetings, conventions or gatherings thereof or possess or distribute any literature, propaganda or other writings or productions thereof.

This proclamation and the regulations herein contained shall extend and apply to all land and water, continental or insular, in any way within the jurisdiction of the United States.

In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States of America to be affixed.

Done at the City of Washington this 7th day of December, in the year
    of our Lord nineteen hundred and forty-one, and of the
[SEAL] Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and
    sixty-sixth.

FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT

By the President:
CORDELL HULL,
Secretary of State.

[No. 2525]

[F. R. Doc. 41 9233; Filed, December 8,1941 : 3:59 p. m.]

Page 37

WAR WITH GERMANY

[ALIEN ENEMIES GERMAN]

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

A PROCLAMATION

Authority

Whereas it is provided by section 21 of title 50 of the United States Code as follows:

"Whenever there is a declared war between the United States and any foreign nation or government, or any invasion or predatory incursion is perpetrated, attempted, or threatened against the territory of the United States by any foreign nation or government, and the President makes public proclamation of the event, all natives, citizens, denizens, or subjects of the hostile nation or government, being of the age of fourteen years and upward, who shall be within the United States and not actually naturalized, shall be liable to be apprehended, restrained, secured, and removed as alien enemies. The President is authorized in any such event, by his proclamation thereof, or other public act, to direct the conduct to be observed, on the part of the United States, toward the aliens who become so liable; the manner and degree of the restraint to which they shall be subject and in what cases, and upon what security their residence shall be permitted, and to provide for the removal of those who, not being permitted to reside within the United States, refuse or neglect to depart therefrom; and to establish any other regulations which are found necessary in the premises and for the public safety."

And whereas by sections 22, 23 and 24 of title 50 of the United States Code further provision is made relative to alien enemies:

PROCLAMATION

Now, therefore, I, Franklin D. Roosevelt, as President of the United States and as Commander in Chief of the Army and Navy of the United States, do hereby make public proclamation to all whom it may concern that an invasion or predatory incursion is threatened upon the territory of the United States by Germany.

Conduct to be observed by alien enemies

And, acting under and by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution of the United States and the said sections of the United States Code, I do hereby further proclaim and direct that the conduct to be observed on the part of the United States toward all natives, citizens, denizens or subjects of Germany being of the age of

Page 38

fourteen years and upwards who shall be within the United States or within any territories in any way subject to the jurisdiction of the United States and not actually naturalized, who for the purpose of this Proclamation and under such sections of the United States Code are termed alien enemies, shall be as follows:

All alien enemies are enjoined to preserve the peace towards the United States and to refrain from crime against the public safety, and from violating the laws of the United States and of the States and Territories thereof; and to refrain from actual hostility or giving information, aid or comfort to the enemies of the United States or interfering by word or deed with the defense of the United States or the political processes and public opinions thereof; and to comply strictly with the regulations which are hereby or which may be from time to time promulgated by the President.

All alien enemies shall be liable to restraint, or to give security, or to remove and depart from the United States in the manner prescribed by sections 23 and 24 of title 50 of the United States Code, and as prescribed in the regulations duly promulgated by the President.

Duty and authority of the Attorney General and the Secretary of War

And, pursuant to the authority vested in me, I hereby charge the Attorney General with the duty of executing all the regulations hereinafter prescribed regarding the conduct of alien enemies within continental United States, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands and Alaska, and the Secretary of War with the duty of executing the regulations which are hereinafter prescribed and which may be hereafter adopted regarding the conduct of alien enemies in the Canal Zone, the Hawaiian Islands and the Philippine Islands. Each of them is specifically directed to cause the apprehension of such alien enemies as in the judgment of each are subject to apprehension of deportation under such regulations. In carrying out such regulations within the continental United States, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands and Alaska, the Attorney General is authorized to utilize such agents, agencies, officers and departments of the United States and of the several states, territories, dependencies and municipalities thereof and of the District of Columbia as he may select for the purpose. Similarly the Secretary of War in carrying out such regulations in the Canal Zone, the Hawaiian Islands and the Philippine Islands is authorized to use such agents, agencies, officers and departments of the United States and of the territories, dependencies and municipalities thereof as he may select for the purpose. All such agents, agencies, officers and departments are hereby granted full authority for all acts done by them in the execution of such regulations when acting by direction of the Attorney General or the Secretary of War, as the case may be.

Page 39

REGULATIONS

The regulations contained in Proclamation No. 2525 of December 7, 1941, relative to natives, citizens, denizens or subjects of Japan are hereby incorporated in and made a part of this proclamation, and all be applicable to alien enemies defined in this proclamation.

This proclamation and the regulations herein prescribed shall extend and apply to all land and water, continental or insular, in any way within the jurisdiction of the United States.

In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States of America to be affixed.

Done at the City of Washington this 8th day of December, in the
    year of our Lord nineteen hundred and forty-one, and of the
[SEAL] Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and
    sixty-sixth.

FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT

By the President:
CORDELL HULL,
Secretary of State.

[No. 2526]

[F. R. Doc. 41-9237; Filed, December 9, 1941; 9:30 a. m.]

Page 40
(blank)

Page 41

WAR WITH ITALY

[ALIEN ENEMIES ITALIAN]

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

A PROCLAMATION

Authority

Whereas it is provided by section 21 of title 50 of the United States Code as follows:

"Whenever there is a declared war between the United States and any foreign nation or government, or any invasion or predatory incursion is perpetrated, attempted, or threatened against the territory of the United States by any foreign nation or government, and the President makes public proclamation of the event, all natives, citizens, denizens, or subjects of the hostile nation or government, being of the age of fourteen years and upward, who shall be within the United States and not actually naturalized, shall be liable to be apprehended, restrained, secured, and removed as alien enemies. The President is authorized in any such event, by his proclamation thereof, or other public act, to direct the conduct to be observed, on the part of the United States, toward the aliens who become so liable; the manner and degree of the restraint to which they shall be subject and in what cases, and upon what security their residence shall be permitted, and to provide for the removal of those who, not being permitted to reside within the United States, refuse or neglect to depart therefrom; and to establish any other regulations which are found necessary in the premises and for the public safety."

And whereas by sections 22, 23 and 24 of title 50 of the United States Code further provision is made relative to alien enemies:

PROCLAMATION

Now, therefore, I, Franklin D. Roosevelt, as President of the United States and as Commander-in-Chief of the Army and Navy of the United States, do hereby make public proclamation to all whom it may concern that an invasion or predatory incursion is threatened upon the territory of the United States by Italy.

Conduct to be observed by alien enemies

And, acting under and by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution of the United States and the said sections of the United States Code, I do hereby further proclaim and direct that the conduct to be observed on the part of the United States toward all natives, citizens, denizens or subjects of Italy being of the age of fourteen years and upwards who shall be within the United States

Page 42

or within any territories in any way subject to the jurisdiction of the United States and not actually naturalized, who for the purpose of this Proclamation and under such sections of the United States Code are termed alien enemies, shall be as follows:

All alien enemies are enjoined to preserve the peace towards the United States and to refrain from crime against the public safety, and from violating the laws of the United States and of the States and Territories thereof; and to refrain from actual hostility or giving information, aid, or comfort to the enemies of the United States or interfering by word or deed with the defense of the United States or the political processes and public opinions thereof; and to comply strictly with the regulations which are hereby or which may be from time to time promulgated by the President.

All alien enemies shall be liable to restraint, or to give security, or to remove and depart from the United States in the manner prescribed by Sections 23 and 24 of Title 50 of the United States Code, and as prescribed in the regulations duly promulgated by the President.

Duties and authority of the Attorney General and the Secretary of War And, pursuant to the authority vested in me, I hereby charge the Attorney General with the duty of executing all the regulations hereinafter prescribed regarding the conduct of alien enemies within continental United States, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands and Alaska, and the Secretary of War with the duty of executing the regulations which are hereinafter prescribed and which may be hereafter adopted regarding the conduct of alien enemies in the Canal Zone, the Hawaiian Islands and the Philippine Islands. Each of them is specifically directed to cause the apprehension of such alien enemies as in the judgment of each are subject to apprehension or deportation under such regulations. In carrying out such regulations within the continental United States, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands and Alaska, the Attorney General is authorized to utilize such agents, agencies, officers and departments of the United States and of the several states, territories, dependencies and municipalities thereof and of the District of Columbia as he may select for the purpose. Similarly the Secretary of War in carrying out such regulations in the Canal Zone, the Hawaiian Islands and the Philippine Islands is authorized to use such agents, agencies, officers and departments of the United States and of the territories, dependencies and municipalities thereof as he may select for the purpose. All such agents, agencies, officers and departments are hereby granted full authority for all acts done by them in the execution of such regulations when acting by direction of the Attorney General or the Secretary of War, as the case may be.

Page 43

REGULATIONS

The regulations contained in Proclamation No. 2525 of December 7, 1941, relative to natives, citizens, denizens or subjects of Japan are hereby incorporated in and made a part of this proclamation, and shall be applicable to alien enemies defined in this proclamation.

This proclamation and the regulations herein prescribed shall extend and apply to all land and water, continental or insular, in any way within the jurisdiction of the United States.

In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States of America to be affixed.

Done at the City of Washington this 8th day of December, in the
    year of our Lord nineteen hundred and forty-one, and of
[SEAL] the Independence of the United States of America the one
    hundred and sixty-sixth.

FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT

By the President:
CORDELL HULL,
Secretary of State.

[No. 2627]

[F. R. Doc. 41-9238; Filed, December 9, 1941; 9:30 a. m.]

Page 44
(blank)

Page 45

PUBLIC LAW NO. 338

JOINT RESOLUTION removing restrictions on the territorial use of units and members of the Army of the United States, extending the periods of service of such personnel, and amending the National Defense Act with respect to the meaning of the term "Army of the United States"

Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That the provisions of Public Resolution Numbered 96, Seventy-sixth Congress, approved August 7, 1940, as amended, and of Public, Numbered 783, Seventy-sixth Congress (the Selective Training and Service Act of 1940), as amended, insofar as they restrict the territorial use of units and members of the Army of the United States, are suspended during the existence of any war in which the United States is engaged, and during the six months immediately following the termination of any such war.

SEC. 2. The periods of service, training and service, enlistment, appointment, or commission, of all members of the Army of the United States now or hereafter in or subject to active military service of the United States are extended for the period stated in the preceding section: Provided, That nothing in this section shall be construed to prevent the President from terminating such periods of service, training and service, enlistment, appointment, or commission at an earlier date in any case.

SEC. 3. Section 1 of the National Defense Act of June 3, 1916, as amended, is amended by striking out the period at the end thereof and inserting in lieu of such period a comma and the following: "and shall include persons inducted into the land forces of the United States under Public, Numbered 783, Seventy-sixth Congress (the Selective Training and Service Act of 1940), as amended.".

Approved by the President December 11, 1941.