GOALS   |   BACKGROUND   |   SOLs   |   DEMOS   |   INTERACTIVE   |   EXAMPLES   |   RESOURCES


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TITLE:  Concave and Convex Mirrors and Lenses
Presented to grade level 5

GOALS
Concave and Convex Mirrors and Lenses is designed to teach fifth grade level students about light relection and refraction as shown in curved mirrors and lenses.
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SPECIFIC OBJECTIVES

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BACKGROUND
        Concave mirrors bend inward like a cave.  These mirrors reflect light rays inward towards a focal point.  Images will appear upside down from far away, but very close to the mirror, they will appear right side up and very large.  In contrast, concave lenses reflect light rays outwards.  The image through a concave lens will always be right side up.
        Convex mirrors curve outwards and reflect light rays away from the center.  Images will appear right side up and smaller than the actual object.  Convex lenses, on the other hand,  refract light rays in toward a central point.  The image seen through a convex lens is upside down when the lens is held away from your face, but the image is magnified and right side up when the lens is held closer to your eye.
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SOLs COVERED
SOL 5.9 The students will describe the effects of lenses and mirrors on the path of light.  Descriptive statement: Experiences should include the manipulation of lenses and mirrors and examples of their uses in flashlights, eyeglasses, cameras, and telescopes.
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DEMONSTRATIONS AND EXHIBITS
Materials needed:  tennis ball, cereal bowl, shiny spoon, concave-lensed eyeglasses, magnifying glass, two convex lenses, plane mirror, concave mirror, microscope; also possible access to a reflecting telescope.

1. Light rays are reflected from mirrors.
Concave mirrors:

Convex mirrors: 2. Light rays are refracted as they travel through lenses.
Concave lenses: Convex lenses: 3.  Telescopes and microscopes use different combinations of mirrors and lenses to magnify objects that are hard to see.  (See Resources for local public access to both reflecting and refracting telescopes.) Return to top of page
 

INTERACTIVE EXERCISES
Materials needed:  microscope, clean microscope slide and cover, sample specimen (onion layer, a typed letter, eyelash, etc.)

1. Prepare a slide for the microscope.

2. Review Sheet.
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INTERESTING EXAMPLES
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OTHER RESOURCES
 
Literature
 
 

 

Pasachoff, Jay M.  2000. Science Explorer:  Sound and Light. Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River, NJ.

Walpole, Brenda.  1988. 175 Science Experiments to Amuse and Amaze Your Friends.  Random House, New York, NY.

Local Places to Visit University of Virginia observatories
Related Web Sites

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Site author:  Andrew Wozniak
Site maintained by lmj8a@virginia.edu
last updated: March 10, 2000
http://faculty.virginia.edu/teach-present-bio/